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Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. This book i will not be using to help trian my puppy. I would like a more positive exierence and i do not feel this book is very positive. Springers respond to positive trianing and this is not at all positive i will be looking into other books to help me with my pup. One person found this helpful.

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If you pick a breed that's prone to packing on pounds, you'll need to limit treats, make sure he gets enough exercise, and measure out his daily kibble in regular meals rather than leaving food out all the time. Dogs come in all sizes, from the world's smallest pooch, the Chihuahua, to the towering Great Dane, how much space a dog takes up is a key factor in deciding if he is compatible with you and your living space.

Large dog breeds might seem overpowering and intimidating but some of them are incredibly sweet! Take a look and find the right large dog for you! Easy to train dogs are more adept at forming an association between a prompt such as the word "sit" , an action sitting , and a consequence getting a treat very quickly. Other dogs need more time, patience, and repetition during training. Many breeds are intelligent but approach training with a "What's in it for me?

Dogs who were bred for jobs that require decision making, intelligence, and concentration, such as herding livestock, need to exercise their brains, just as dogs who were bred to run all day need to exercise their bodies. If they don't get the mental stimulation they need, they'll make their own work -- usually with projects you won't like, such as digging and chewing. Obedience training and interactive dog toys are good ways to give a dog a brain workout, as are dog sports and careers, such as agility and search and rescue.

Common in most breeds during puppyhood and in retriever breeds at all ages, mouthiness means a tendency to nip, chew, and play-bite a soft, fairly painless bite that doesn't puncture the skin. Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or "herd" their human family members, and they need training to learn that it's fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people. Mouthy breeds tend to really enjoy a game of fetch, as well as a good chew on a chew toy that's been stuffed with kibble and treats. Some breeds sound off more often than others. When choosing a breed, think about how the dog vocalizes — with barks or howls — and how often.

If you're considering a hound, would you find their trademark howls musical or maddening? If you're considering a watchdog, will a city full of suspicious "strangers" put him on permanent alert? Will the local wildlife literally drive your dog wild? Do you live in housing with noise restrictions? Do you have neighbors nearby? Some breeds are more free-spirited than others. Nordic dogs such as Siberian Huskies were bred to range long distances, and given the chance, they'll take off after anything that catches their interest.

And many hounds simply must follow their noses, or that bunny that just ran across the path, even if it means leaving you behind. High-energy dogs are always ready and waiting for action. Originally bred to perform a canine job of some sort, such as retrieving game for hunters or herding livestock, they have the stamina to put in a full workday. They need a significant amount of exercise and mental stimulation, and they're more likely to spend time jumping, playing, and investigating any new sights and smells.

Low-energy dogs are the canine equivalent of a couch potato, content to doze the day away. When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you'll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying. A vigorous dog may or may not be high-energy, but everything he does, he does with vigor: These dynamos need lots of training to learn good manners, and may not be the best fit for a home with young kids or someone who's elderly or frail. A low-vigor dog, on the other hand, has a more subdued approach to life.

Some breeds do fine with a slow evening stroll around the block. Others need daily, vigorous exercise -- especially those that were originally bred for physically demanding jobs, such as herding or hunting. Without enough exercise, these breeds may put on weight and vent their pent-up energy in ways you don't like, such as barking, chewing, and digging.

Breeds that need a lot of exercise are good for outdoorsy, active people, or those interested in training their dog to compete in a high-energy dog sport, such as agility. Some dogs are perpetual puppies -- always begging for a game -- while others are more serious and sedate. Although a playful pup sounds endearing, consider how many games of fetch or tag you want to play each day, and whether you have kids or other dogs who can stand in as playmates for the dog.

The English Springer Spaniel, named for the way he "springs" at game to flush it for the hunter, has long been a favorite with sportsmen, but this lively, beautiful dog also makes a wonderful family companion if he receives the training and exercise he needs. English Springer Spaniels are smart and eager to please, not to mention enthusiastic. They are happy dogs and seem to have a good sense of humor. They usually do well with children if they are brought up with them from puppyhood and are affectionate toward their families.

They also are generally good with other pets in the household, even small ones, but might see pet birds as prey since those are what they're bred to hunt.

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Because they're hunting dogs, English Springer Spaniels require a lot of exercise , but keep them on leash in unfenced areas or they may decide to go hunting on their own. Because they are such good athletes, many non-hunting owners participate in activities such as obedience, agility , flyball, and tracking with their English Springer Spaniels. They also make great therapy dogs, bringing smiles to people in hospitals and nursing homes. English Springer Spaniels will bark if strangers come to your house, but if you're looking for a guard dog, keep looking.

They are loving, gentle dogs who expect even strangers to give them attention. Because of their affectionate nature, they aren't a one-person dog. They are very people-oriented , and shouldn't be left home alone or isolated from people for long periods. English Springers are medium-size dogs with the typical gentle spaniel expression and drop ears.

Their compact body is protected by a dense, medium-length coat adorned with feathering, a longer fringe of hair, on the ears, chest, legs, and belly. The wag of the docked tail can only be described as merry. Their bodies are a little longer than they are tall. Those are the basics, but if you were to put two English Springer Spaniels next to each other, they might look very different.

That's because in many sporting hunting breeds, some dogs are bred to work in the field, while others are bred primarily to be show dogs. Eventually, they become two very different types, and that's what has happened with English Springer Spaniels. Why are we telling you this? Read on and we'll explain. The gene pools of field and show dogs have been almost completely segregated for about 70 years. Field Springer Spaniels are athletes and they look the part.

They usually have shorter coats, their noses are pointier, and their ears are not as long. Field Springers are bred for hunting ability, sense of smell , and trainability. Show Spring Spaniels have longer hair, a squarer muzzle, and longer ears. They're prized for their good looks and showmanship. Show dogs can hunt, but they're too slow and methodical to do well in field trials, which is where field-bred Springers shine.

The differences affect you when you're choosing a puppy. Both types need lots of exercise, but if you want a companion, a field-bred Springer may have more energy than you need or want. Look for a puppy from show lines. If you want a Springer who will be competitive in field trials, just the opposite is true. It's essential, then, to have a clear idea of what you want from a Springer when you talk to breeders.

English Springer Spaniel Dog Breed Information and Personality Traits

They can help you choose the puppy that's right for you or direct you to a breeder whose dogs will better fit your needs. In fact, that's the test of a really great breeder--she wants to help you find the dog that's right for you, even if that means losing a sale. Spaniels were mentioned in Welsh law as early as A. That's more than 1, years ago! Spaniels that look similar to today's English Springer Spaniel are depicted in 16th and 17th century artwork.

Before guns were invented, the spaniel was used to flush gamebirds or small animals by springing at them and driving them into the open so they could be captured by hunting hawks, coursing hounds, or nets flung over them. When firearms were invented in the 17th century, spaniels proved to be especially adept at flushing game for shooters.

Your Own Springer Spaniel Companion

During the 19th and early 20th centuries in England, dogs of the same litter were classified by their hunting use rather than their breed. Smaller dogs in the litter would be used to hunt woodcock, and therefore were called Cockers. Larger pups in the same litter would be used to flush game and were called Springers. In , England's Kennel Club granted a special place in their Stud Book for the English Springer Spaniel, and a separate classification at their show in At that show, Mr.

William Arkwright judged the breed. He awarded the dog Challenge Certificate to Mr. Winton Smith's Beechgrove Will and best of opposite sex went to Mr. Harry Jones' bitch Fansome. By , Beechgrove Will became the breed's first Champion. In , an English Springer Spaniel was imported by a Canadian breeder. A little more than 10 years later, the breed had become one of the most popular breeds registered by the American Kennel Club. At that time, English Springer Spaniels that competed in field trials on one day might be shown in conformation dog shows the next day.

That changed in the early s when field trial enthusiasts began breeding dogs with qualities that would produce top results in the field, and show enthusiasts began to breed dogs that were both consistent with the breed's standard, and had the "flash" to win in the show ring. Field-bred dogs are bred for a keen sense of smell, speed, style, working ability and endurance above all, and today the two types are not interbred.

Both types have the instinct to work and can be trained to the gun, but very few English Springer Spaniels work in both field and show events. The last dual champion meaning that it was a champion in both field and conformation events was a dog named Green Valley Punch in Whether he's a field or show dog, however, today's English Springer is a popular breed, ranking 26th among the breeds registered by the American Kennel Club.

English Springer Spaniels weigh between 45 and 55 pounds and stand 18 to 22 inches tall at the shoulder. Field-bred Springers are generally a bit lighter than those bred for the show ring.

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The typical Springer is friendly, eager to please, quick to learn, and willing to obey. He should never be aggressive or timid. In recent years there have been reports of aggression or excessive timidity in the breed, as well as excessive separation anxiety. These traits aren't desirable and could be an indication of poor breeding. As with any breed of dog, it's important to research breeders and find ones who test their breeding stock not only for genetic diseases but also temperament.

Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.

Springers need early socialization and training. Early socialization helps ensure that your Springer puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Springers are generally healthy, but like all breeds, they're prone to certain health conditions. Not all Springers will get any or all of these diseases, but it's important to be aware of them if you're considering this breed. If you're buying a puppy, find a good breeder who will show you health clearances for both your puppy's parents. Health clearances prove that a dog has been tested for and cleared of a particular condition.

In Springers, you should expect to see health clearances from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals OFA for hip dysplasia with a score of fair or better , elbow dysplasia, hypothyroidism, and von Willebrand's disease; from Auburn University for thrombopathia; and from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation CERF certifying that eyes are normal. You can confirm health clearances by checking the OFA web site offa.

English Springer Spaniels are loving, devoted dogs who can live comfortably in most homes as long as they get plenty of daily exercise. The amount of exercise your adult Springer needs depends; Field Springers need more than Show Springers. If you have a fenced yard or acreage where he can play, your Springer will enjoy being outdoors with you while you garden or read or grill dinner. He'll run around on his own, then check in with you every few minutes, just as he might do in the field with a hunter. One or two daily mile-long walks will also help him work off all that Springer energy.

Springers also like to swim, and if you have a pool or access to a lake, it's a great way for them to get exercise. Puppy kindergarten once or twice a week is a great way to get exercise, training, and socialization, plus 15 to 20 minutes of playtime in the yard, morning and evening. Throw a ball for them to fetch.

Highlights

Weekly obedience classes and daily half-mile walks will meet their needs, plus playtime in the yard. Play fetch with a ball or Frisbee for up to 40 minutes during cool mornings or evenings, and not in the heat of the day. Continue to limit walks to a half mile. Your Springer pup can begin to jog with you, but keep the distance to less than a mile and give him frequent breaks along the way.

As he continues to mature, you can increase the distance and time you run.

These graduated levels of exercise will protect his developing bones and joints. Puppies may eat as much as 4 cups a day. How much your adult dog eats depends on his size, age, build, metabolism, and activity level. Dogs are individuals, just like people, and they don't all need the same amount of food. It almost goes without saying that a highly active dog will need more than a couch potato dog.

For more on feeding your Springer, see our guidelines for buying the right food , feeding your puppy , and feeding your adult dog. English Springer Spaniels have a double coat, which means that they have an insulating undercoat that's covered with a topcoat, in much the same way that you might layer a sweater and a coat for warmth. Their medium-length topcoat is flat or wavy, and the undercoat is short, soft, and dense. Together, they're waterproof, weatherproof, and thornproof.

They have a fringe of feathering on the ears, chest, legs and belly.