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Level of Description identifies the level of the unit of description in relation to the others. As already mentioned, the option fell to level 05 Documental item, which corresponds to the lowest documental unit, intellectually indivisible, an integral part of files or processes. Dimension and Support identifies and registers the physical or logical dimensions, and also the support of the unit of description. They require the following information: General Notes provides information that was not included in any of the other areas. When, at certain times of the description, it was not possible to identify the information due to degradation of the document or difficulty in reading it, we used the conventional bracketed ellipsis Name s of the Producer s identifies the name s of the producer s of the unit of description, which corresponds to the statement of the Principle of Provenance, which should be brought in line with the other elements of description used such as: Scope and Content contains additional or relevant information to the title element of the unit of description.

We chose to identify in this element the indication of annexes s , if any, in the document described. System of arrangement provides information about the internal structure of the unit of description. It informs the order of the unit of description. What feeling do you have about what is happening now in Bahia, compared to the first time you were here, 12 years ago? One of the things that the Biennale has to its advantage is its inclusion in the city, in the context of Bahia.

When I came here in , there was no contact between the lives of the artists and the city. And this time I had the opportunity to immerse myself, visiting institutions that I did not know of, and see the other places where the Biennale is present. I find Salvador much more active artistically; and there is now a different spirit here.

This has to do with the Biennale, and it seems to me that it is a model of Biennale that should be replicated in many other places. Because one of the problems that biennales have, which is a paradox, is that almost always the biennale is identified with the name of a city and yet it has nothing to do with the city. When you were here, the idea of calling a foreign curator to see the portfolio of artists meant a desire for insertion in the system, in some way.

What would mean a real insertion? It seems to me that is something that has not only to do with biennales, but with contemporary art in general, which has gone through a process of reduction of its public. It has become a very self-referential language; very specialized and based very much on collectible inaccessible objects rather than on a more mass-based distribution. This has impacted on the communication of contemporary art with the world. Anywhere in the world you have to see the possibility of art inserting itself in a more dynamic way into society itself, and not just being there as a chapel.

And I believe that contemporary art, by its methodological liberty and morphological freedom, has that ability to be able to participate, the ability to enter. But often it does the opposite. I think there is an almost ontological problem that affects what we call the visual arts; it is the way it is consumed that is different from the rest of the arts. And the market is also totally different. The rest of the arts came about in the Industrial Revolution. And the visual arts separated themselves from the Industrial Revolution and preserved the unique, hand-made object.

As a consequence its consumption is based on the uniqueness factor and collected by people who have the money to do it, or by museums and institutions. A singer, the song of a musician is not collectible. What interests them is selling thousands of DVDs, or being downloaded from the Internet, or filling a stadium for a concert, like a writer with a book, etc.

Art can make a digital video that can reproduce itself ad infinitum, but it says no, they are only ten copies, and it certifies in a registry office that there are only ten copies, just like a photo. It even contradicts the very possibilities of mechanical reproduction; it denies it to preserve this limited, expensive object, from the market. It happens that collectors have great power, whether they are museums, private collectors, or foundations.

Do you think it is possible to turn this trend around? I think it is possible; in other words, I do not think there will be a complete transformation, nor that it will be something quick, but there is the possibility of doing it by the very dynamic that contemporary art has. We say that anything can be art nowadays. And even then it gives you the opportunity to enter other situations. It may be very difficult, or impossible, but it is as impossible as it is necessary.

If the Biennale was not restricted to the art world, what would its mission be then? What you did here is a very clear example. There is a Biennale in Istanbul curated by Charles Esche and this Turkish counterpart, Vasif Kortun, with resident artists who carried out projects for the city, the communities, deviating a bit from the touristic Istanbul. The Biennale of Havana, at its time, when it was well advanced into the city, was very popular and had a general participation.

I think it is a duty of a biennale to do this, advance to models that broaden the real public participation. Of course, this is not only the work of curators and artists, but educational work is necessary; as well as efforts devoted to communication. There are many things that can be exploited and done.

And it seems to me that the decision is as follows: With this I am not saying that there is a kind of art that is very valuable and that it is a white cube. I am not proclaiming: But I do see that we are totally on the side of the white cube. I think that art can vary more, discover itself, it has to take off its suit and go more often to the beach. What are the obstacles of making this happen?

On the other side is the institutionalization of art, all the networks of museums and other institutions that already follow and are used to this kind of art presentation. And there is a certain accommodation in tradition. The tradition can be broken, but it takes work. On the other hand, it is very encouraging that there are many processes that you see around the world in informal groups, based on artists, by young curators who make such a different scene.

There are practices of a looser art, more critical, and this is very positive. We discussed a lot in the process of making the Biennale this relationship between art and education, including about how it has contributed to this situation of separation. Did you ever think a little bit about this relationship? Yes, and I would go beyond that. It looks to me that there is a problem in the way the departments of education of museums or biennials are structured, which act as resonators of the curatorial work. In other words, act in a second instance. And this is useful, but not sufficient.

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I see the education department working with the curatorship, at the same time. And by doing so, the project already has an educational take within itself, and not in a second moment. Do you think it is necessary to hold a biennale without exhibitions? This biennale has exhibitions, of course, but you said something the other day that really impressed me, that more than half of the activities are not exhibitions.

Do you think it is necessary to hold a biennale without artists? In other words, as if it were like a real festival, but a festival of knowledge, dialogue and exchange. It would, perhaps, be a utopian model. But anyway, I think these utopias, what good they have to offer, is that they make us move towards improving things. There is a German philosopher, Ernst Bloch, who came up with the concept of concrete utopia. He says that the present can also be modeled with the aspirations we have for the future.

He does not proclaim a proactive utopia separate from reality, but a utopia based on the actual situation and aspirations of each person. It is a model that I really like because it implies a grounded action, not like other utopias that become, in the end, elements of a repressive and authoritative character.

Yes, I think it is in the doing. And not in an improvised manner, this is a very structured biennale. Everything is systematic, is taxonomized, a little inspired on the Marcel Broodthaers museum, but in a very poetic and suggestive way. But at the same time it is something that is being done in a response to a situation. I think it was you who told me that there was no artist list. That sounds wonderful, because the list will be made as they arise and as reality requires. Also, this Biennale of an extended time period, days, seems also very good to me, because it gives the possibility of adjusting as it goes, creating things.

Here the important thing is the model which has been presented, and its effectiveness. Curator, critic and art historian, the Cuban Gerardo Mosquera was one of the organizers of the biennial project for Havana, being part of its curatorial group in the first three editions and directly responsible for the paradigm shift in the art system that they caused.

Free and open to people over eighteen years old, either attending a high school or graduated, it brought together such a diverse body of knowledge, as diverse as the participants. The course trained candidates, of whom 74 became mediators working in the exhibition spaces and educational activities of the 3rd Biennial. It also created, from among its entrants, the first audience of the Biennale. The essentially educational perspective adopted in the mediation training was consistent with - and necessary to - a Biennale whose theme involves critical reflection, and whose project involves dialogue with diverse audiences, in different contexts.

We have included in this course various forms of communication and interaction between teachers and students, such as lectures, round table discussions, seminars, dialogues — both in the classroom and online - statements, spaces for discussion and the application of knowledge, individual and collective activities, [and] workshops I would like to conclude this brief intervention with the words of Paulo Freire, who guides our conduct. I hope these words will be of encouragement to the work you will perform here during the coming months: Teaching which is what we will do requires methodical rigor; research; respect to the knowledge and autonomy of the students; criticality; aesthetics and ethics; risk and acceptance of the new; rejection of discrimination; critical reflection on practice; recognition of cultural identity; awareness of the unfinished; common sense; humility and tolerance; happiness and hope.

It requires a belief that change is possible. It requires curiosity and generosity; safety, professional competence and commitment. It requires the openness to dialogue and love for the students. And above all, teaching requires understanding and believing that education is a way - a beautiful way, in fact - to intervene in the world. There were theoretical classes, lectures, readings, group dynamics, research and audiovisual presentations, organized around the themes Biennials and Mediation; The History of Art; Thinking the Northeast; Accessibility; Security notions; and specific content of the 3rd Bahia Biennial.

For some participants, this was their first insertion in the context of a discussion about art, history, society and education. The environment of exchange, due to the heterogeneous, procedural, and critical nature of the course, was instrumental in the formation of the participants and the entire staff of the Educational team. It was the Biennale happening even before the opening ceremony. The Educational Department of the Biennale worked from the understanding that mediation is always, and necessarily, in the process.

Therefore, upon completion of the course and throughout the Biennale, training was continued through individual dialogues at the exhibition spaces, journal writings, and general meetings to exchange experiences. One of the meetings of the Training Course for Mediators of the 3rd Biennial was attended by guests who had been monitors at the 1st Biennial, held in One of them, the anthropologist, artist and professor Renato Da Silveira, spoke a little bit about the course which taught them about the work of a monitor and about the political and cultural landscape at the time.

We met and constantly discussed everything. The Biennale was a major meeting in two regards: He compares that environment to the political moment that the country was experiencing: After four months of training, the mediators of the 3rd Bahia Biennial were deployed to the different exhibition spaces according to their availability and affinity with the location and curatorial proposals.

This articulation was essential for a favorable dynamic for their continuing work and trainings. The Educational Department of the Biennale believes that training does not end in the period of the course, following in the progress with experience, reflective action and research. The opening, on different dates, of the various exhibitions, demanded many adjustments and compensations of scale and attention to the personal interests involved, and were decisive factors for a dynamic which was difficult to generate, but enriching for the production team and especially for mediators.

Many of them, from a group of about 80, transited through different exhibition spaces, and thus could have a better understanding of the whole project and an ability to articulate what was highlighted in each exhibition. In this way, they could represent the parts and the whole with a clearer overview and motivation. The mediators of the 3rd Bahia Biennial developed strategies to approach the specific curatorial proposals for each exhibition space and their works, searching, through dialogue and occasional provocations,.

Assuming the role of a partner for each visitor, the mediators taught and learned in a continuous communication process. Thus, the negotiation and updating of content is dynamic and constant, in and between each exhibition space. This understanding of the work of mediation establishes a fundamental rule in accommodating the public: The Imaginary Museum of the Northeast - Department of Ways of Education, setting itself as a space for the educational and not exhibitionary, and by being located at the Museum of Modern Art, a place with a huge demand from local and foreign visitors, served as a point of reference for understanding and reflecting on the Biennale as a whole, and its various exhibition proposals.

It offered the public a relaxed environment that valued their individuality as guests, recognizing in the involvement of each visitor and of each participant or worker of the Biennale a sense of community and a continuous in-progress dynamic. A collaborative wall, which still today resists a consensual name, was the protagonist of this dynamic.

Influenced by the Literary spelling book by Paulo Freire, the Educational Department reserved the space for drawings and pictures made by the visitors, inviting them to draw or write about words or ideas relating to dayto-day life, the present and the Northeast. This wall was unblocking, proactive and empowering the conversation and meeting, resulting in a collection of images and ideas from words like Dictatorship, Freedom, Museum, Time and Quality. For this purpose, it assembled a team of mediators who explored circuits in Salvador as territories of meeting, dissemination and dialogue about the 3rd Bahia Biennial, its curatorial proposal and program.

These circuits included streets, schools, shops, restaurants, and parks, and each situation demanded from the mediators different strategies of approximation; some mediators improvised small performances, others sat at the table with domino players, while others have addressed groups of youths asking: The Guerrilla Action was a direct way to inform and engage more people with the Biennale, but it was also a way for the mediators to come into real contact with the public and expand the space for dialogue of the mediation beyond the exhibition space.

Three moments of the Guerrilla action: The dynamic of entering rooms, speaking in front of new people and answering questions was the first exposure for many of mediators - a first taste of what would, from then on, be a relationship of ever-growing and direct contact with the public. The course was held in streets that are very noisy during the day, with crowds coming and going, full of peddlers wanting to attract the attention of the passersby. Other performances were held in small groups on the crossings when the traffic lights went red. Many preferred to work on individual or small group discussions, inviting the public to participate in the Biennale.

This way, the audience addressed by the mediators was the public who came to watch the bands. Initially worried about having to compete for the public attention with guitar chords, mediators - when talking to people individually - found an audience that was interested and willing to dialogue. How was your experience at the residency at Sacatar Institute? Lisette Lagnado - It went beyond what I expected, and it was also far from those expectations.

There are two opposite directions I need to mention. I could not do the reading program I imagined I would and I could not write the texts that I thought would be needed to get out of here with a reflection on this process. And also far, because I know that for a residency to actually happen, it has to be done at length. And two weeks seem like two months, but are just two weeks. For my part there lacked availability in my agenda; making it impossible that I could stay longer and, from Sacatar, make other expeditions. There was an amazing thing that was the days spent on the island thinking about what the island has to offer and the encounters with the artists there.

So in that sense, it went beyond. I thought I would be alone and it would be an environment for thinking, philosophizing; but it was a sharing environment. From your experience, can you explain in what way the curatorship carries out critique on a process like the Biennale? Lisette - There is much talk of the exhaustion of the biennial model. Since the s, this exhibition format exploded in several cities. Cities that already had an institutional structure; a cultural circuit organized around museums, cultural centers and galleries, but also deserted cities in terms of apparatus and cultural facilities.

It is a counter-biennale because it is a biennale which thinks every day. It is a biennial of much more action than project. I can see a project, I can see a program. This reinvention every day because of the adversity of the site is what makes this a more critical biennial. And in that sense, I can almost say that it is a counter-biennale because the biennial is a. And I think the upside here is that I do not see a rigid institution, I do not see a rigid model. I see one thing, always in motion. And I think the critical nature should be exactly this ability to rethink the whole time.

After a while it subsided slightly, when Belo Horizonte entered in the map. I believe that the turning point is located when the Belo Horizonte Salon was turned into the residency grant of the Pampulha. It was a project designed by Adriano Pedrosa and effectively made Belo Horizonte a living place again. Belo Horizonte has always been an important place, but artists used to leave Belo Horizonte for other cities.

This exodus is the problem with which we must deal. As was the exodus of artists during the dictatorship, looking for a place with more freedom. Thereafter, Recife became another very interesting place. Also because of artists who circulated in the Southeast and now transit to Recife. I think we are now living a more interesting time in that these categories or geographical classifications have lost their meaning. What does she do? There is an entire occupation to be made.

And not necessarily from just one local viewpoint. I think it would be very interesting to get people to connect. What dialogue could we think of between the three capitals of Brazil: Bahia, Rio de Janeiro and Brasilia? They are three historically distinct capitals with very. Lisette - Everything is Northeast if we understand that the northeast is a place that is not in the center.

I use this question as a starting point, actually. It comes to my attention that the title of the Biennale was indeed a question with a question mark. Because behind me, in this dish here, we see como viver junto how to live together , also formed with a question mark. We understood that if you are asking questions, maybe people could provide answers and these answers would function as a sort of primer, self-help. All this comes from the book of Roland Barthes, and Roland Barthes did not use a question mark, but why? Because he is not giving answers. He is describing little fantasies, small utopias.

So, Como viver junto is nonetheless something you might find at a given time. It may correspond to the definition of heterotopia of Michel Foucault, but I absolutely did not want como viver junto to be understood as a program. Then yes, we had a number of characteristics we tried to absorb into the exhibition. But is it all Northeast? After that I think would be interesting to design a program.

Lisette Lagnado is a critic, curator and researcher. Among her works are Drifts and Derivations: Lisette participated in the residency program during the 3rd Bahia Biennial. It was a claim and a ghost that haunted the unconsciousness of the artists, especially the young ones. The speeches were many, it lacked analysts.

Over the last forty years, we have not advanced in thought, or even built a more effective cultural policy, despite the investment in mobilizing communities and art workers around the theme, in this country. The report of who lived and who has followed the events of the Bahia Biennials, even distant in time, puts in focus a different context to the moment we are living, forgotten at the back of the memory, important for resuming an experience with historical references.

The art scenes in and 68 were of a Bahia interested in the decentralization of Brazilian art. In the second half of the sixties, there was a desire to follow the diversities of the Brazilian avant-garde in Bahia. There was an avant-garde procedure, not a thought, which was more of an inconformity with the situation in Bahia in relation to the concerns of the s: A willingness to interchange with the vanguard resulted in the Biennials of Bahia, which counted with the participation of the most important manifestations of the era: Concretism, Neoconcretism, Tropicalia etc, making Salvador the center of visual arts in Brazil.

They provoked the local cultural scene, contrary to an. As the political regime of the late was little in favor of cultural freedom, the 2nd Biennial was closed. That was the end of an initiative which left Brazilian art in a state of mourning. The 2nd Biennial was closed soon after opening, due to the critical political moment that the country was passing.

The expected cultural shift with industrialization was nothing but a dream. The cultural and political reality today is another, but it is necessary to know the past to take a step forward. An art exhibition of national repercussion is the object of anxiety of all local artists and something promised by the State that deserves its purest attention. Especially in times of biennials, curatorships and residencies, the expectation is different from the s.

The discussions promoted by the Director of the Museum were timely, putting the relevant issues on the table, exceeding the possibilities of the simple staging of exhibitions, such as: Between the bureaucracy of editals, the incentive laws and the superiority of the market, the museums are walking a tightrope, without resources to accomplish their projects and to maintain a program free from from external pressures on the cultural commitments of the institution. If the MAM should, or not, promote a national art show, does not matter.

First it is necessary to have a broader curatorial project, able to overcome the bureaucracy and external pressures; in other words, a supporting device to ensure that the exhibition is not a large, isolated party, which ends up with a hangover the next day. After culture was dominated by barbarism, in a society that favors the production of cultural goods, the thought was defeated by the entertainment industry and power of the market.

Who ends up deciding what art is, is the market; with advertising appeal, it imposes value and legitimacy. Art fairs mobilize investors; exceed expectations in terms of art biennials, which have been transformed into supermarket of the suburbs, with cheaper products for the consumer middle class. People no longer believe in language, but in the exchange value. Thought is the spilled liquid that glows on the surface of the work, with a limited shelf life. If the object of art is a false diamond, it does not matter; it satisfies the so-called creative economy.

The audience with an education not committed to art history looks for a safe investment. A biennial of art, like a car fair, if not a bank of reliable information, brings to the market innovations to stimulate or attract the attention of consumers. But with minimal intelligence, it can help to inform and transform the art medium. Although the state, on behalf of a cultural democracy, prefers to invest in training proponents, courses of how to fill out forms and the design of projects, rather than critic artist information, public education, training of human resources and qualification of cultural spaces.

The pre-biennale discussion organized by MAM-BA was worth it - the reconstruction of history is favorable to thought, and culture profits from it. Not everything is absurd and bizarre. The 3rd Biennial is no longer a dream. Further down the line, after inaugurated, it deserves a critical analysis. It is intended that this action is part of the program of the 3rd Bahia Biennial, in the period between July 17th and September 7th, The texts will be applied with paint, in reference to the popular typology of Bahian lyricists.

The 3rd Bahia Biennial is responsible for the entire production, as well as the painting of the poems and phrases. No Utopia inhabits me any more. An endangered animal, I want to practice poetry - The least guilty of all occupations. Enter the sea let the sea noise involve you even erase the human blah-blah-blah.

There are also the boys of Outros Diversos, Casa de Batatinha and other artists that make this meeting possible. Performance shows itself markedly in my relationship with art. Everything mixes in need, ritual, superstition, faith and desire for communication and poetry. It is based on them that I think about performance and understand my process. They are my inspiration so I can move between art and life, developing my work. During these days, I went around with Gabriel Guerra to record this action in places in Salvador.

The neighborhoods, streets and street nicknames were chosen along with the public in the first month. The Church is next to my house, so I kept my usual routine, like in my relationship with the butterflies. I could not predict it before starting the occupation, but they came and many were born within the Church, like what happens in my house.

What was presented is something that is still in process and its essence is my relationship with the city, the history and people of that place. It all starts in Aflitos. I speak of the relations with neighbors, friends, artists, the square, the city, and of course the Caboclo, the Caboclo and all the energy that comes from the strangled and intense nature of that point in the city center.

I also speak of the independence of Bahia, Brazil, the conflicts of Brazilian miscegenation, of all Saints bay and Dois de Julho. I live on the Hill of Aflitos, next to the church. What happens there is a strong connection with the Caboclo of Aflitos. The Church is the main point of energy. Along with it I present my life and my working process to the public during the occupation. I am part of the parish community and this work involves the complicity of Father Aderbal and all the people who are part of the Church. The Caboclo has connected with me since when I moved there.

Even with the church closed, before starting the refurbishment of the structural part, I was already part of the meetings and performative spaces: There are several stories and many I learned there, with each carrying a reference, a memory, a gift The artist who deals with space operates with assemblages and the production of effects. Restless and ready to move in any direction, enabled by the intensities that are beyond our control, always indicating or suggesting a broader, complex and uneven multi-territorial reality. It is this perspective that makes an alternative interpretation of the San Francisco river possible, of its design and typology; what gives the place its specificity is the fact that the spaces can be translated from the understandings that contribute to its orbit, the negotiations themselves are not inert: Perhaps one should also say that about the river, that it is also a process.

Today we experiment a multi-optional space in the composition of our identity and territoriality. The attempted diversions, flow control and the flow of information, of people and things, the building of new walls, ducts, barriers, territorial restraints and so on, show the face of a power and its dam effect. It is exactly this point that provokes one of the greatest paradoxes in the understanding of space these days. On one hand we see the fluidity of a flexible and moving space, on the other we have the continuous production of these borders, boundaries and strategies of enclosure and control in, and between, the spaces and territories.

What comes next are movements of counter-positioning faced to the instrumentalization and manipulation of the spaces, flows and subjects by the state or other control systems. And when the mechanisms of closure and containment no longer respond, the occurrence of flow and seepage processes is inevitable, as well as the tactics to outline in contrast the borders and limits. Strategies for diversion appear in search of an exit away from the edges, the surveillance of the walls and control. Illegal immigrants, drug trafficking, smuggling, espionage, piracy, tax evasion and so on are emblems of these strategies of evasion where you are always in the middle or on the verge of positioning between one territory and another.

A strategy where reaction prevails in the works and where tactics of mobility, mapping experiences and displacements are a counter-point to the well-thought static occupations, such as buildings and long-term monuments. You did something similar to this work in , in Minas Gerais, but what is it like doing it here in Salvador? Nuno Ramos - I did it in Minas like a film. The thread was a film that we were making.

Here it is a bit different: It wants to illuminate, like a flashlight, a strange light, desolate places, abandoned, lost. Places that tomorrow, when we remove these circles, will not have anything to do with what we are seeing now. Now this life, if we inhabit it with what we already know, such as theater groups, groups of this and that, institutions, I think it would kill the idea.

So we think that the work needs to escape somewhat from the public, and is to that extent that it will succeed. Which is not to say that there can be no audience, or that whoever is close would not be welcome, but would have to be this weird move; kind of case-by-case. But when you call an audience, which was the case today, what is your idea- to make people think about the space? Nuno — Yeah, I think that is in the actual context of the Biennale.

A Biennale that always occupies the same places in the same urban area, it stretches its reach with these works. Now by doing this, it also loses some access to the public, it is a work with its back to the public. Of course it will be released to the public as a film, or other formats, such as this interview, for example. There is another issue that is the. De repente, um elefante do circo pegou Alem pela tromba.

Ele parou de chorar e o elefante ficou olhandoo. Alem levou um susto muito grande. Ele brincou de pular com Alem. O menino ficou super feliz. O menino pensava que queria ir ao banheiro, mas a professora estava falando: A Bad Dream Once upon a time in the U.

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A there lived an ordinary family. In the family there were two kids. One kid was named Jack and the other was named Jeff. In their room there was a magic mirror. One day they were sleeping and the mirror started glowing and it sucked them into another world. When they woke up they were in Candy Land! When they saw everything around them was made of candy they were amazed. Jack loved green gummy bears so he started eating them and he finished all of them.

Then he went deeper and deeper into the pile to find more green gummy bears. He looked inside and was surprised to see a crocodile inside. Luckily for him the crocodile only ate candy and not kids. In the meantime Jeff saw peanut butter. He loved peanut butter so he ran toward it. He jumped into the peanut butter pond. He found out it was actually peanut butter quicksand.

When he started sinking deeper and deeper he started screaming. Then he woke up and found out it was only a bad dream. Tenho que fazer xixi Um dia, tinha uma professora que estava ensinando sobre elefantes. A professora disse que ele esperasse o sinal bater. Nerd, Normal and Champion Once there lived a nerd that created a new computer. The nerd named Fred had a lab to create things, but one day when he came home he saw his lab door was open and he saw that he was robed. He saw something on the ground and it was his minicomputer! He saw where his things were but he remembered that he needed to do something and he went and he grabbed his coat and just went to have a haircut and he bought flowers to a nerd girl.

He went back home like a normal kid that is a boyfriend. He got a little more friends but he still is a little nerdy. One day he saw a dog who could not breathe in the pool and he was going to die. He jumped in the pool and he became one of the 2nd best swimmers in the world! The 1st best swimmer said to Fred to go to the Olympics!! Fred went to the Olympics and he became famous and he traveled around the world on his tour and took the nerd girl too and they lived happily ever after!!

A pomba Vicentina Era uma vez uma pomba chamada Vicentina. Ela estava voando por um parque. Depois, Vicentina passou por uma casa. Ela viu uma menina sem flores para vender. Vicentina viu um jardim. Ela pegou flores do jardim. Viveram felizes para sempre. Branca de Neve percebeu que eles eram legais e comeu com eles. Eles se casaram e viveram felizes para sempre. Um menino estava vendo o show.

Ele se perdeu do seu pai. Ele estava com medo porque estava pegando fogo. O elefante que estava participando do show foi ajudar o menino a encontrar seu pai. O menino estava feliz de novo porque o elefante o ajudou a encontrar seu pai. Quando Caio chegou em casa, viu Fernando vendo TV. Fernando colocou o volume muito alto. Caio falou para Fernando parar! Depois, Fernando e Caio conversaram e Fernando abaixou o volume.

Um dia, a madrasta disse para o seu espelho: Ela queria achar um jeito para pegar a Branca de Neve. Eles a convidaram para um jantar. Eles fizeram coisas divertidas com ela e nem se preocuparam com a madrasta. Um dia, a madrasta maldosa perguntou ao espelho: Ela achou um plano para pegar a menina. Eles se casaram e ficaram felizes para sempre.

Ela perguntou de novo: Ele a levou para a floresta, onde ela iria estar segura. Na floresta, ela encontrou uma casinha bem pequena e, quando entrou, viu 7 caminhas. Como ela estava muito cansada, colocou uma cama ao lado da outra e adormeceu. A madrasta ficou ainda mais brava. Olha o Gato Era uma vez , um rato chamado Beto. Ele estava dando uma volta. O gato se bateu. De novo Beto viu uma bola, mas ele pensou que desta vez era somente uma bola.

So he just rinsed his mouth and came out. His parents were very happy to see that he was an independent boy. He then went to sleep. Every day he started doing this. His parents organized his 5th birthday party. Tony was very happy. On his birthday, he had a tooth ache, so he went to the dentist. I have not been brushing my teeth at night. He said to himself, next time I will not let this happen. I did not actually fool my parents, I just fooled myself! Eshann Saxena Language Arts — Ms. A Rafaela viu o arbusto se mexendo e disse: Paula Bertagnoli Earth paint, sand and charcoal A Paula e a Sofie foram ver o que era.

Quando viram, era um coelho verde com um monte de machucados. E a Paula disse: Quando perceberam, estavam no meio de um monte de bichos com machucados. O Cachorro e o Gato Era uma vez um menino chamado Alberto, ele estava no parque com seu cachorro Luiz e de repente achou seu amigo Tomas e seu gato Bernardo. Um dia, um rato chamado Bacon estava passeando. De repente, o gato assustou o rato.

O gato estava tentando pegar o rato. Quando o gato estava tentando pegar o rato, ele bateu na parede: O gato desmaiou e o Bacon olhou na porta. O Bacon estava andando bem relaxado. O Bacon estava encostando no gato e de repente. Caio Gobbo de Oliveira Portuguese — Ms. E quando viu, era apenas o dono dele. Earth paint, sand and charcoal Alexia Apples Love Especially loves mac and cheese I love you!

Always amazing LA — Ms. Melissa My sister is nice Excellent Lovely I love my older sister. She plays a lot. September birthday At night, she reads a book. Ananda Always respectful Never mean Adores pizza Not perfect Delighted to do stuff and favors for other people! April is my birthday month! Ananda Mehta LA — Ms. Ela agradeceu e ficou bem feliz! Ela agradeceu e Vicentina voou com um sorriso no rosto. Helena Nascimento Portuguese — Ms. Never gets cold Constantly smiling I am in Brazil. Layers Amanda Dobrow Have you ever noticed that soil has layers.

There are different kinds of layers. The layers are top soil, bedrock and humus. There are types of soil size also. They are sand, silt and clay. Soil comes in many different colors like yellow, brown, black and red. The layers are formed in different soils. Clay is the strongest and darkest of all soil size layers. Sand is the one that gets looser. Silt is a little lighter than then clay.

Sand is the lightest of all size soil layers. These are all the soil layers and soil size layers that are the most important to soil. These are also good so plants grow big, strong and healthy. Muppet Soil wolski owner 48hotmail. We did a Mini Metric Olympics contest for a math project. This graph shows the results for cotton ball. In this event, we throw the cotton ball and we measured how you get it. The range is from. Maria Clara did the most with Vini did the least with cm.

The mode is nothing because they are all different children got that amount. The median is The mean is The person closest to the mean average is scored by David. I learned that you can see how you is perfect in the games of Olympics games you can get it any score! I am like an ostrich Rushing in the desert with energy, Jogging around a park luckily, Standing tall in the sky bravely. I am like the rain, Falling in the landform fast, Dropping in the ranch drained, Puddling in the city exhausted I am like a backpack Excited about the trip, Traveling around the world happily, Tiring out on my journey.

Humus is one of the best layers because it helps the roots of the plants get through and it has nutrients. Humus is organic matter which is decaying matter. The first is humus which is organic matter. Last but not least bed rock which is broken up rocks. Humus is good for the plants. But we are building houses on the best soil. So if your job is to build houses try not to destroy the good soil. If you have a garden those are the layers of soil. Those layers of soil are in the same order every day and everywhere. T black, brown, red, wh grey. You would norm orange in Brazil. You w color in Poland.

You w in America. Black a dark because they ha are certain colors bec in them. There are als soil. There Those types are hite, green, and mally find a reddishwould find a brown would find a black il is green because cean. You would hina they use it to and grey soil are ave humus in it. Silt of Soil Soil is formed by Mother Nature. It is formed like this. First comes weathering which cracks the bed rock. Then the rocks get smaller and smaller and organic matter forms.

Then, the top soil is formed and other layers are below it. Top soil is made of broken up rocks, dead leaves and dead bugs. The basic material is parent material. Eduardo Amaral I am like. I am like a cheetah, Running across the savanna with speed, Chasing in the grassland hungrily, Climbing up trees to rest quietly. I am like a jet ski, Growling noisily as I start, Flying across the ocean speedily, Floating down the river lazily. I am like a back pack, Traveling to places by airplane, Going to school with homework, Full of ideas. I am like… I like a Bugatti Veyron Running fast on the racetrack Humming on the street quietly Looking high tech I am like a tiger Growing angry hunting Running hungrily cute Small fast jumping I am like the rain jumping to the earth falling fast from the sky making a lot of noise.

I am like a glass, seeing everything, making the people see better, having lots of colors. I am like… I am like a cheetah, Sneaking in the savanna quietly, Dodging in the forest smartly, Running in the grassland freely. I am like a jet plane, Carrying my passengers quickly to their destination, Wasting fuel above the clouds, Landing in the station softly. I am like a video game, Waiting to reach a high score, Standing still in a corner tired of the work, Everyone playing with me. I am like a waterfall, Falling in the forest powerfully, Leaving peace all around, Rushing from the river to the fall.

This graph shows the results for Giant Step. In this event, we step as far we can, then a person in our group measures how far we step. The range is from to 75cm. Bruno did the least with 75 cm. I have two modes 98 and because children 2 got that amount. The median is 99, and 1children got each amount. I really enjoyed doing this project! This graph shows the results for high jump. In this event, we need to jump and touch in the paper. The range is from 28cm to 16cm. Laura did the most with 28 cm. Vini did the least with16cm.

The mode is 24 because 3 children got that amount. Breno, Julia and Mateus are exactly average at I like this event because I know that I jumped high. My Favorite Things My favorite things make my life fun. My favorite foods are really good. I like my favorite Holidays. I like to go to restaurants. I like my favorite food.

I like strawberry ice cream in cones and I like to eat ice cream on a hot day. I like green or purple grapes that are sweat. I like to eat these foods. My favorite restaurants are good, nice and beautiful. Badida is a barbecue place and has really good cheese bread and good foods.

It has a lot of types of rocks Manuela Silveira Vino has really goods desserts and really goods foods and Vino is a good restaurant. This restaurant was very good. My favorite holidays are Christmas, my birthday, and Easter. During Christmas, I get presents and toys, and I spend some time with my family. During my birthday I get presents, I get older, and I play with my family.

At Easter I get toys, chocolate and chocolate eggs. I love these foods My favorite foods are really good. My restaurants are fun to eat at or go to. My holidays are fun. I like these things. I am like a cheetah Rushing at the savanna with lots of speed Not getting tired at the plains Spying in the grass for my snack. I am like a video game Standing in a house with a high highscore Sitting on the floor quietly Resting in a corner turned off.

The Best Soil By: We put worms in my soil because we get just the top soil. My soil is good for plants not for weeds. If you buy in my company you are going to be impressed. If you like my soil we are going to give bones for you. Tanks for buying at Roar Soil. How Soil All soils have different colors. Soil has different minerals that help us with plants to grow. The soil colors are brown, black, red and gray. The soil is good when is at the top has all the nutrients. If you want your plant to grow you must have a good soil!

Types of Soil Soil is formed break. The rock into soil this years or more. Over are going to b the rocks are b The soil can b leaves too. Th pieces of the r how the soil is m The soil is made ng of rock or r time the layers be formed. When broken very small. Is like this med!!! The basic thing that plants need is sun, water and are. Different seeds need different temperatures to grow. The plants need food like people and animals. The food that the plants need is decomposes, water and sun shine.

The plants like to grow in hot and worm places. If yours plants do not grow you are in the wrong business. Science— Rae Leiper I am like I am like a lion, Running dangerously to get my prey. Acting like the queen of the savanna. Taking care of my cubs. I am like a jeep, Driving slowly on Miami street, Cruising coolly in the cold after noon, Bring fun to people. I am like a river, Carrying people slowly along, Bumping madly over the stones, Splashes playfully on the rocks. I am like an earring, Hanging neatly in the shop, Swinging prettily from people ears, Shining in the sun.

Clifton My Favorites I love my favorite things. My favorite animals are the cutest animals. My favorite places are fun. My favorite foods are delicious. Look and see my favorite things.

I get really happy when I have favorite foods. I love my favorite foods. The cutest animals are my favorite animals. Horses and Mariana Machado Cats are small and good climbers. Snow leopards are really fury and big and big good climbers. My favorite animals are really cute.

My favorite places are really cool. I like Fernao de Noronha because it is I get really hot and the water is clear. Jriquaquara is small and sandy. Gaspar is hot and small. Good food keeps me from being hungry. My life would be sad without cute animals. Cool places keep me from being bored. Do you know what plant need to grow healthy? Plants need CO2, H2O, air, nutrients and minerals. One of those is CO2 that means carbon dioxide. The next one is the H2O that it means is water. Air is also very important to plants.

Nutrients are also important to plants because it is in the soil. The last thing is the minerals that also important to plants and it is also in the soil. What Do Plants Need? Layers of Soil Types Soil is amazing. There There are six different The soil is different co on parent material. Th white, brown, black, g soil is green because it the ocean. We can find find red at Brazil and o on the soil. You can fin Poland, little bit on Am places in the world. W soil in America.

The so Gravel is the biggest si second biggest is the s smallest or the third b is the same size of the the size it is the clay. It to see in a scale you w Did you know that there are layers of soil. The letter of the layers are A, B, C and D. The first layer is the letter A humus that has organic matter. The second layer is the letter B that is the top soil. It is a mix of humus and soil. The third layer of soil is the letter C. In this soil there is rocks and soil. The last one that is the fourth layer of soil is the letter D that is the bedrock.

Bedrock is broken up pieces of rock. They stay like this because the water from the rain will crack the bedrock. Then the rocks get smaller because the organic matter is growing on top. It is so fun to study about the layers of soil. Green t is made and found under d white soil at china. We can other places that have iron nd brown soil at Brazil, merica and lots of other We can find a lot of the black oil can have different sizes. The sand with 1mm. The second biggest is the silt is 1mm and e sand. The smallest of all of ts size is 01mm.

Soil is made from different things. To make top soil the ingredients are broken up pieces of rocks, dead leaves, dead animals, tree limbs and also dead bugs. How soil gets its minerals in the soil. When a Living thing like an animal or a plant dies little bugs eat their meat then their pop gives the minerals to the soil. I am like I am like a turtle Walking on the sand Defending myself against my enemy Swimming through the water. I am like a thunder storm Crashing thunders through the sky Floating above the earth with anger Realizing darkness wherever I go.

I am like a rock Sitting quietly in the grass Sleeping all day never talking Keeping my secrets. I am like a mini van Carrying lots of people Keeping my focus Driving until I get to my target. I follow the school rules by doing the work, stay quiet and being respectful. Following school rules is important at ISC. April Pareja Language Arts — Ms. I got to this school in toddler and Gabriel and Diego played with me so they became my friends. ISC means a safe place to do things.

That is what ISC means to me! I am a friend by being fun. I am a friend by playing. I am a friend by being nice. Helping others is important at ISC We are all friends! I love It when I Play Tennis! It is so cool. I win all the games. I like to play tennis because I saw my dad playing when I was two years old. Now I have played since I was two years old. It is super cool and it is fun. If I could play tennis for the rest of my life, I would. When I grow up I want to be a professional tennis player. ISC has a park for me to play in. ISC is a good school because I learn.

ISC is a good school because I have friends. Gabriel Iwakura Language Arts — Ms. This is why I love ISC. I help all of my friends. I listen to all my friends. I like all of my friends. My last but not least reason is I respect my friends. I am a good friend! Izabela Lins Language Arts — Ms. It is a place to learn English, have fun and play! Everyone uses the 5rs: Responsible, Ready, Reliable, Respectful and Reflective. It moves like this. It moves like that. It has become a very self-referential language; very specialized and based very much on collectible inaccessible objects rather than on a more mass-based distribution.

This has impacted on the communication of contemporary art with the world. Anywhere in the world you have to see the possibility of art inserting itself in a more dynamic way into society itself, and not just being there as a chapel. And I believe that contemporary art, by its methodological liberty and morphological freedom, has that ability to be able to participate, the ability to enter.

But often it does the opposite. I think there is an almost ontological problem that affects what we call the visual arts; it is the way it is consumed that is different from the rest of the arts. And the market is also totally different. The rest of the arts came about in the Industrial Revolution. And the visual arts separated themselves from the Industrial Revolution and preserved the unique, hand-made object.

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As a consequence its consumption is based on the uniqueness factor and collected by people who have the money to do it, or by museums and institutions. A singer, the song of a musician is not collectible. What interests them is selling thousands of DVDs, or being downloaded from the Internet, or filling a stadium for a concert, like a writer with a book, etc. Art can make a digital video that can reproduce itself ad infinitum, but it says no, they are only ten copies, and it certifies in a registry office that there are only ten copies, just like a photo.

It even contradicts the very possibilities of mechanical reproduction; it denies it to preserve this limited, expensive object, from the market. It happens that collectors have great power, whether they are museums, private collectors, or foundations. Do you think it is possible to turn this trend around?

I think it is possible; in other words, I do not think there will be a complete transformation, nor that it will be something quick, but there is the possibility of doing it by the very dynamic that contemporary art has. We say that anything can be art nowadays. And even then it gives you the opportunity to enter other situations.

It may be very difficult, or impossible, but it is as impossible as it is necessary. If the Biennale was not restricted to the art world, what would its mission be then? What you did here is a very clear example. There is a Biennale in Istanbul curated by Charles Esche and this Turkish counterpart, Vasif Kortun, with resident artists who carried out projects for the city, the communities, deviating a bit from the touristic Istanbul.

The Biennale of Havana, at its time, when it was well advanced into the city, was very popular and had a general participation. I think it is a duty of a biennale to do this, advance to models that broaden the real public participation. Of course, this is not only the work of curators and artists, but educational work is necessary; as well as efforts devoted to communication.

There are many things that can be exploited and done. And it seems to me that the decision is as follows: With this I am not saying that there is a kind of art that is very valuable and that it is a white cube. I am not proclaiming: But I do see that we are totally on the side of the white cube. I think that art can vary more, discover itself, it has to take off its suit and go more often to the beach. What are the obstacles of making this happen? On the other side is the institutionalization of art, all the networks of museums and other institutions that already follow and are used to this kind of art presentation.

And there is a certain accommodation in tradition. The tradition can be broken, but it takes work. On the other hand, it is very encouraging that there are many processes that you see around the world in informal groups, based on artists, by young curators who make such a different scene. There are practices of a looser art, more critical, and this is very positive.

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We discussed a lot in the process of making the Biennale this relationship between art and education, including about how it has contributed to this situation of separation. Did you ever think a little bit about this relationship? Yes, and I would go beyond that. It looks to me that there is a problem in the way the departments of education of museums or biennials are structured, which act as resonators of the curatorial work. In other words, act in a second instance.

And this is useful, but not sufficient. I see the education department working with the curatorship, at the same time. And by doing so, the project already has an educational take within itself, and not in a second moment. Do you think it is necessary to hold a biennale without exhibitions? This biennale has exhibitions, of course, but you said something the other day that really impressed me, that more than half of the activities are not exhibitions.

Do you think it is necessary to hold a biennale without artists? In other words, as if it were like a real festival, but a festival of knowledge, dialogue and exchange. It would, perhaps, be a utopian model. But anyway, I think these utopias, what good they have to offer, is that they make us move towards improving things.

There is a German philosopher, Ernst Bloch, who came up with the concept of concrete utopia. He says that the present can also be modeled with the aspirations we have for the future. He does not proclaim a proactive utopia separate from reality, but a utopia based on the actual situation and aspirations of each person.

It is a model that I really like because it implies a grounded action, not like other utopias that become, in the end, elements of a repressive and authoritative character. Yes, I think it is in the doing. And not in an improvised manner, this is a very structured biennale. Everything is systematic, is taxonomized, a little inspired on the Marcel Broodthaers museum, but in a very poetic and suggestive way. But at the same time it is something that is being done in a response to a situation. I think it was you who told me that there was no artist list.

That sounds wonderful, because the list will be made as they arise and as reality requires. Also, this Biennale of an extended time period, days, seems also very good to me, because it gives the possibility of adjusting as it goes, creating things. Here the important thing is the model which has been presented, and its effectiveness. Curator, critic and art historian, the Cuban Gerardo Mosquera was one of the organizers of the biennial project for Havana, being part of its curatorial group in the first three editions and directly responsible for the paradigm shift in the art system that they caused.

Free and open to people over eighteen years old, either attending a high school or graduated, it brought together such a diverse body of knowledge, as diverse as the participants. The course trained candidates, of whom 74 became mediators working in the exhibition spaces and educational activities of the 3rd Biennial. It also created, from among its entrants, the first audience of the Biennale. The essentially educational perspective adopted in the mediation training was consistent with - and necessary to - a Biennale whose theme involves critical reflection, and whose project involves dialogue with diverse audiences, in different contexts.

We have included in this course various forms of communication and interaction between teachers and students, such as lectures, round table discussions, seminars, dialogues — both in the classroom and online - statements, spaces for discussion and the application of knowledge, individual and collective activities, [and] workshops I would like to conclude this brief intervention with the words of Paulo Freire, who guides our conduct. I hope these words will be of encouragement to the work you will perform here during the coming months: Teaching which is what we will do requires methodical rigor; research; respect to the knowledge and autonomy of the students; criticality; aesthetics and ethics; risk and acceptance of the new; rejection of discrimination; critical reflection on practice; recognition of cultural identity; awareness of the unfinished; common sense; humility and tolerance; happiness and hope.

It requires a belief that change is possible. It requires curiosity and generosity; safety, professional competence and commitment. It requires the openness to dialogue and love for the students. And above all, teaching requires understanding and believing that education is a way - a beautiful way, in fact - to intervene in the world. There were theoretical classes, lectures, readings, group dynamics, research and audiovisual presentations, organized around the themes Biennials and Mediation; The History of Art; Thinking the Northeast; Accessibility; Security notions; and specific content of the 3rd Bahia Biennial.

For some participants, this was their first insertion in the context of a discussion about art, history, society and education. The environment of exchange, due to the heterogeneous, procedural, and critical nature of the course, was instrumental in the formation of the participants and the entire staff of the Educational team. It was the Biennale happening even before the opening ceremony. The Educational Department of the Biennale worked from the understanding that mediation is always, and necessarily, in the process.

Therefore, upon completion of the course and throughout the Biennale, training was continued through individual dialogues at the exhibition spaces, journal writings, and general meetings to exchange experiences. One of the meetings of the Training Course for Mediators of the 3rd Biennial was attended by guests who had been monitors at the 1st Biennial, held in One of them, the anthropologist, artist and professor Renato Da Silveira, spoke a little bit about the course which taught them about the work of a monitor and about the political and cultural landscape at the time.

We met and constantly discussed everything. The Biennale was a major meeting in two regards: He compares that environment to the political moment that the country was experiencing: After four months of training, the mediators of the 3rd Bahia Biennial were deployed to the different exhibition spaces according to their availability and affinity with the location and curatorial proposals.

This articulation was essential for a favorable dynamic for their continuing work and trainings. The Educational Department of the Biennale believes that training does not end in the period of the course, following in the progress with experience, reflective action and research. The opening, on different dates, of the various exhibitions, demanded many adjustments and compensations of scale and attention to the personal interests involved, and were decisive factors for a dynamic which was difficult to generate, but enriching for the production team and especially for mediators.

Many of them, from a group of about 80, transited through different exhibition spaces, and thus could have a better understanding of the whole project and an ability to articulate what was highlighted in each exhibition. In this way, they could represent the parts and the whole with a clearer overview and motivation. The mediators of the 3rd Bahia Biennial developed strategies to approach the specific curatorial proposals for each exhibition space and their works, searching, through dialogue and occasional provocations,. Assuming the role of a partner for each visitor, the mediators taught and learned in a continuous communication process.

Thus, the negotiation and updating of content is dynamic and constant, in and between each exhibition space. This understanding of the work of mediation establishes a fundamental rule in accommodating the public: The Imaginary Museum of the Northeast - Department of Ways of Education, setting itself as a space for the educational and not exhibitionary, and by being located at the Museum of Modern Art, a place with a huge demand from local and foreign visitors, served as a point of reference for understanding and reflecting on the Biennale as a whole, and its various exhibition proposals.

It offered the public a relaxed environment that valued their individuality as guests, recognizing in the involvement of each visitor and of each participant or worker of the Biennale a sense of community and a continuous in-progress dynamic. A collaborative wall, which still today resists a consensual name, was the protagonist of this dynamic. Influenced by the Literary spelling book by Paulo Freire, the Educational Department reserved the space for drawings and pictures made by the visitors, inviting them to draw or write about words or ideas relating to dayto-day life, the present and the Northeast.

This wall was unblocking, proactive and empowering the conversation and meeting, resulting in a collection of images and ideas from words like Dictatorship, Freedom, Museum, Time and Quality. For this purpose, it assembled a team of mediators who explored circuits in Salvador as territories of meeting, dissemination and dialogue about the 3rd Bahia Biennial, its curatorial proposal and program. These circuits included streets, schools, shops, restaurants, and parks, and each situation demanded from the mediators different strategies of approximation; some mediators improvised small performances, others sat at the table with domino players, while others have addressed groups of youths asking: The Guerrilla Action was a direct way to inform and engage more people with the Biennale, but it was also a way for the mediators to come into real contact with the public and expand the space for dialogue of the mediation beyond the exhibition space.

Three moments of the Guerrilla action: The dynamic of entering rooms, speaking in front of new people and answering questions was the first exposure for many of mediators - a first taste of what would, from then on, be a relationship of ever-growing and direct contact with the public.

The course was held in streets that are very noisy during the day, with crowds coming and going, full of peddlers wanting to attract the attention of the passersby. Other performances were held in small groups on the crossings when the traffic lights went red. Many preferred to work on individual or small group discussions, inviting the public to participate in the Biennale. This way, the audience addressed by the mediators was the public who came to watch the bands. Initially worried about having to compete for the public attention with guitar chords, mediators - when talking to people individually - found an audience that was interested and willing to dialogue.

How was your experience at the residency at Sacatar Institute? Lisette Lagnado - It went beyond what I expected, and it was also far from those expectations. There are two opposite directions I need to mention. I could not do the reading program I imagined I would and I could not write the texts that I thought would be needed to get out of here with a reflection on this process. And also far, because I know that for a residency to actually happen, it has to be done at length.

And two weeks seem like two months, but are just two weeks. For my part there lacked availability in my agenda; making it impossible that I could stay longer and, from Sacatar, make other expeditions. There was an amazing thing that was the days spent on the island thinking about what the island has to offer and the encounters with the artists there.

So in that sense, it went beyond. I thought I would be alone and it would be an environment for thinking, philosophizing; but it was a sharing environment. From your experience, can you explain in what way the curatorship carries out critique on a process like the Biennale? Lisette - There is much talk of the exhaustion of the biennial model. Since the s, this exhibition format exploded in several cities. Cities that already had an institutional structure; a cultural circuit organized around museums, cultural centers and galleries, but also deserted cities in terms of apparatus and cultural facilities.

It is a counter-biennale because it is a biennale which thinks every day. It is a biennial of much more action than project. I can see a project, I can see a program. This reinvention every day because of the adversity of the site is what makes this a more critical biennial. And in that sense, I can almost say that it is a counter-biennale because the biennial is a. And I think the upside here is that I do not see a rigid institution, I do not see a rigid model. I see one thing, always in motion. And I think the critical nature should be exactly this ability to rethink the whole time.

After a while it subsided slightly, when Belo Horizonte entered in the map. I believe that the turning point is located when the Belo Horizonte Salon was turned into the residency grant of the Pampulha. It was a project designed by Adriano Pedrosa and effectively made Belo Horizonte a living place again.

Belo Horizonte has always been an important place, but artists used to leave Belo Horizonte for other cities. This exodus is the problem with which we must deal. As was the exodus of artists during the dictatorship, looking for a place with more freedom. Thereafter, Recife became another very interesting place. Also because of artists who circulated in the Southeast and now transit to Recife.

I think we are now living a more interesting time in that these categories or geographical classifications have lost their meaning. What does she do? There is an entire occupation to be made. And not necessarily from just one local viewpoint. I think it would be very interesting to get people to connect.

What dialogue could we think of between the three capitals of Brazil: Bahia, Rio de Janeiro and Brasilia? They are three historically distinct capitals with very. Lisette - Everything is Northeast if we understand that the northeast is a place that is not in the center. I use this question as a starting point, actually.

It comes to my attention that the title of the Biennale was indeed a question with a question mark. Because behind me, in this dish here, we see como viver junto how to live together , also formed with a question mark. We understood that if you are asking questions, maybe people could provide answers and these answers would function as a sort of primer, self-help. All this comes from the book of Roland Barthes, and Roland Barthes did not use a question mark, but why?

Because he is not giving answers. He is describing little fantasies, small utopias. So, Como viver junto is nonetheless something you might find at a given time. It may correspond to the definition of heterotopia of Michel Foucault, but I absolutely did not want como viver junto to be understood as a program. Then yes, we had a number of characteristics we tried to absorb into the exhibition. But is it all Northeast? After that I think would be interesting to design a program.

Lisette Lagnado is a critic, curator and researcher. Among her works are Drifts and Derivations: Lisette participated in the residency program during the 3rd Bahia Biennial. It was a claim and a ghost that haunted the unconsciousness of the artists, especially the young ones.

The speeches were many, it lacked analysts. Over the last forty years, we have not advanced in thought, or even built a more effective cultural policy, despite the investment in mobilizing communities and art workers around the theme, in this country. The report of who lived and who has followed the events of the Bahia Biennials, even distant in time, puts in focus a different context to the moment we are living, forgotten at the back of the memory, important for resuming an experience with historical references.

The art scenes in and 68 were of a Bahia interested in the decentralization of Brazilian art. In the second half of the sixties, there was a desire to follow the diversities of the Brazilian avant-garde in Bahia. There was an avant-garde procedure, not a thought, which was more of an inconformity with the situation in Bahia in relation to the concerns of the s: A willingness to interchange with the vanguard resulted in the Biennials of Bahia, which counted with the participation of the most important manifestations of the era: Concretism, Neoconcretism, Tropicalia etc, making Salvador the center of visual arts in Brazil.

They provoked the local cultural scene, contrary to an. As the political regime of the late was little in favor of cultural freedom, the 2nd Biennial was closed. That was the end of an initiative which left Brazilian art in a state of mourning. The 2nd Biennial was closed soon after opening, due to the critical political moment that the country was passing. The expected cultural shift with industrialization was nothing but a dream. The cultural and political reality today is another, but it is necessary to know the past to take a step forward.

An art exhibition of national repercussion is the object of anxiety of all local artists and something promised by the State that deserves its purest attention. Especially in times of biennials, curatorships and residencies, the expectation is different from the s. The discussions promoted by the Director of the Museum were timely, putting the relevant issues on the table, exceeding the possibilities of the simple staging of exhibitions, such as: Between the bureaucracy of editals, the incentive laws and the superiority of the market, the museums are walking a tightrope, without resources to accomplish their projects and to maintain a program free from from external pressures on the cultural commitments of the institution.

If the MAM should, or not, promote a national art show, does not matter. First it is necessary to have a broader curatorial project, able to overcome the bureaucracy and external pressures; in other words, a supporting device to ensure that the exhibition is not a large, isolated party, which ends up with a hangover the next day. After culture was dominated by barbarism, in a society that favors the production of cultural goods, the thought was defeated by the entertainment industry and power of the market. Who ends up deciding what art is, is the market; with advertising appeal, it imposes value and legitimacy.

Art fairs mobilize investors; exceed expectations in terms of art biennials, which have been transformed into supermarket of the suburbs, with cheaper products for the consumer middle class. People no longer believe in language, but in the exchange value. Thought is the spilled liquid that glows on the surface of the work, with a limited shelf life. If the object of art is a false diamond, it does not matter; it satisfies the so-called creative economy.

The audience with an education not committed to art history looks for a safe investment. A biennial of art, like a car fair, if not a bank of reliable information, brings to the market innovations to stimulate or attract the attention of consumers. But with minimal intelligence, it can help to inform and transform the art medium. Although the state, on behalf of a cultural democracy, prefers to invest in training proponents, courses of how to fill out forms and the design of projects, rather than critic artist information, public education, training of human resources and qualification of cultural spaces.

The pre-biennale discussion organized by MAM-BA was worth it - the reconstruction of history is favorable to thought, and culture profits from it. Not everything is absurd and bizarre. The 3rd Biennial is no longer a dream. Further down the line, after inaugurated, it deserves a critical analysis. It is intended that this action is part of the program of the 3rd Bahia Biennial, in the period between July 17th and September 7th, The texts will be applied with paint, in reference to the popular typology of Bahian lyricists.

The 3rd Bahia Biennial is responsible for the entire production, as well as the painting of the poems and phrases. No Utopia inhabits me any more. An endangered animal, I want to practice poetry - The least guilty of all occupations. Enter the sea let the sea noise involve you even erase the human blah-blah-blah. There are also the boys of Outros Diversos, Casa de Batatinha and other artists that make this meeting possible. Performance shows itself markedly in my relationship with art. Everything mixes in need, ritual, superstition, faith and desire for communication and poetry.

It is based on them that I think about performance and understand my process. They are my inspiration so I can move between art and life, developing my work. During these days, I went around with Gabriel Guerra to record this action in places in Salvador. The neighborhoods, streets and street nicknames were chosen along with the public in the first month.

The Church is next to my house, so I kept my usual routine, like in my relationship with the butterflies. I could not predict it before starting the occupation, but they came and many were born within the Church, like what happens in my house. What was presented is something that is still in process and its essence is my relationship with the city, the history and people of that place.

It all starts in Aflitos. I speak of the relations with neighbors, friends, artists, the square, the city, and of course the Caboclo, the Caboclo and all the energy that comes from the strangled and intense nature of that point in the city center. I also speak of the independence of Bahia, Brazil, the conflicts of Brazilian miscegenation, of all Saints bay and Dois de Julho.

I live on the Hill of Aflitos, next to the church. What happens there is a strong connection with the Caboclo of Aflitos. The Church is the main point of energy. Along with it I present my life and my working process to the public during the occupation. I am part of the parish community and this work involves the complicity of Father Aderbal and all the people who are part of the Church.

The Caboclo has connected with me since when I moved there. Even with the church closed, before starting the refurbishment of the structural part, I was already part of the meetings and performative spaces: There are several stories and many I learned there, with each carrying a reference, a memory, a gift The artist who deals with space operates with assemblages and the production of effects.

Restless and ready to move in any direction, enabled by the intensities that are beyond our control, always indicating or suggesting a broader, complex and uneven multi-territorial reality. It is this perspective that makes an alternative interpretation of the San Francisco river possible, of its design and typology; what gives the place its specificity is the fact that the spaces can be translated from the understandings that contribute to its orbit, the negotiations themselves are not inert: Perhaps one should also say that about the river, that it is also a process.

Today we experiment a multi-optional space in the composition of our identity and territoriality. The attempted diversions, flow control and the flow of information, of people and things, the building of new walls, ducts, barriers, territorial restraints and so on, show the face of a power and its dam effect. It is exactly this point that provokes one of the greatest paradoxes in the understanding of space these days.

On one hand we see the fluidity of a flexible and moving space, on the other we have the continuous production of these borders, boundaries and strategies of enclosure and control in, and between, the spaces and territories. What comes next are movements of counter-positioning faced to the instrumentalization and manipulation of the spaces, flows and subjects by the state or other control systems. And when the mechanisms of closure and containment no longer respond, the occurrence of flow and seepage processes is inevitable, as well as the tactics to outline in contrast the borders and limits.

Strategies for diversion appear in search of an exit away from the edges, the surveillance of the walls and control. Illegal immigrants, drug trafficking, smuggling, espionage, piracy, tax evasion and so on are emblems of these strategies of evasion where you are always in the middle or on the verge of positioning between one territory and another.

A strategy where reaction prevails in the works and where tactics of mobility, mapping experiences and displacements are a counter-point to the well-thought static occupations, such as buildings and long-term monuments. You did something similar to this work in , in Minas Gerais, but what is it like doing it here in Salvador?

Nuno Ramos - I did it in Minas like a film. The thread was a film that we were making. Here it is a bit different: It wants to illuminate, like a flashlight, a strange light, desolate places, abandoned, lost. Places that tomorrow, when we remove these circles, will not have anything to do with what we are seeing now. Now this life, if we inhabit it with what we already know, such as theater groups, groups of this and that, institutions, I think it would kill the idea.

So we think that the work needs to escape somewhat from the public, and is to that extent that it will succeed. Which is not to say that there can be no audience, or that whoever is close would not be welcome, but would have to be this weird move; kind of case-by-case. But when you call an audience, which was the case today, what is your idea- to make people think about the space?

Nuno — Yeah, I think that is in the actual context of the Biennale. A Biennale that always occupies the same places in the same urban area, it stretches its reach with these works. Now by doing this, it also loses some access to the public, it is a work with its back to the public. Of course it will be released to the public as a film, or other formats, such as this interview, for example.

There is another issue that is the. Have you had the experience with this work with the public, of people coming and something unexpected happening? Nuno — I have. For example, yesterday we were here at a junction with three roads, and the generator broke and burned. I had never seen a generator explode, it was pretty crazy; Bang! It caught fire and was burning for hours, it was strong stuff. In other occasions a guy on a unicycle, or another reciting a poem have turned up, without us expecting a thing.

Another time, two actors came, and I kind of directed them. Does it have any relation to the Assis Valente song with the same title? Nuno - The title was very important to me. It is funny how there are works that come from the title, and I think that it was a bit of it in this case. I love the song, but terreiro is anywhere; it is a nowhere and it is anywhere. But here in Bahia, a Terreiro is a sacred place.

Something out of some kind of mystical order It had been many years since I came here in Salvador. Last year when I came I was very impressed with the violence on display, both. I think I could do it here because it has an urban thought of displacement, and of making people understand that this is not so different from the cities in which we live, this place where we are now.

This here has to do with the level of urban desolation in Brazil; it is not such a crazy thing. So, your idea was to call attention to these abandoned spaces, which are here inside, but at the same time outside. What we understand as ours, as urban, as control, is very restricted. There is so much of space like this that a lot people do not know about, but additionally this here is out there too.

We pretend not to see it.