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A little slow but a good story about a fun and sarcastic girl. Fun read Super fun read, witty and sarcastic - I would have loved it even more in high school.

Prom Dates from Hell by Rosemary Clement-Moore | nifaquniky.cf

Probably going to read the next two. Mar 05, Shel rated it liked it Shelves: Prom Dates from Hell. Talk about a bias! I loved the sarcastic, smart voice of Maggie Quinn right away. She reminded me of a hybrid of Veronica Mars and Buffy Summers. But I guess with dark hair. After stopping an incident of bullying in the halls, the three most popular girls in the senior grade all named Jessica take notice of Maggie and start to m Clement-Moore, R.

After stopping an incident of bullying in the halls, the three most popular girls in the senior grade all named Jessica take notice of Maggie and start to make her life hellish. Just in time for prom! No longer able to ignore her intuitions, Maggie enlists the help of an attractive college guy, Justin, to fight evil. I enjoyed Prom Dates from Hell enough that I will definitely be picking up the second and third books in the Maggie Quinn: Maggie has a lot of wonderfully sarcastic narration. I figured out who the real culprit was pretty early on although, Clement-Moore did a good job of constructing her red herring.

I was also a little sceeved out by the age difference between Maggie and Justin. Although Justin's exact age is never specifically given. He's already in college and it's safe to assume he's far along in his program since he talks about graduate credits and what not. Speaking as someone who has been that age, I would have thought that a senior in high school was a wee-little baby and I NEVER would have considered dating someone in such a different position. And I know YA lit loves to have the high school girl date a college boy.

But my immediate response is to wonder what is wrong with said college-aged character that he can't date someone his own age. Plus, beyond battling the forces of darkness, I didn't really feel a special connection between them beyond the occasional one-liner or the unfounded over-protectiveness on the part of Justin.

As a high school prom, however, the evening was marginally less successful. I should start at the beginning, but I'm not entirely certain when that is, so I'll start with the day I realized that despite my most determined efforts, I was not going to be able to ignore the prom entirely" p. Now I'm sort of like the spiny anteater. Small and prickly, trundling along, a threat to no one. Except ants, I guess, which is where the metaphor runs out" p.

I barely had time to wonder, a half-fired neuron of warning, then everything went wrong" p. For the first time that day, I felt as if I'd gotten the upper hand in a human interaction" p. Besides homework, newspaper, and yearbook, there was saving the world as well. Where was I going to fit in a date?

Not for the obvious reasons, but because they were so irrational that there was no defense against them. But I couldn't actually be hanged for a witch. I wouldn't put anything past the Republicans" p. Prom Dates… is a great little read. Also, she uses logic and science to explain and figure out all of the supernatural goings-on. And she manages to have a great relationship with her parents and grandmother, and it feels realistic. The plot flows really well. Like I just mentioned, I like how once Maggie accepts all of these accidents are supernatural, she start eliminating every possibility before figuring out the force causing everything.

Designated love interest Justin is a little harder to pin down, but I generally liked him. He plays off Maggie well, and some of my favorite parts of the book is their banter. As a villain, Stanley is the weakest character in the whole—he only feels like the intended antagonist just because.

Despite its faults, I have such a good time reading this book. Highly enjoyable, and comes very recommended. Feb 28, Wendy Cantu rated it it was amazing Shelves: Rosemary Clement-Moore is awesome. Now onto the only slightly more articulate review: In extremely oversimplified words that in no way gives this series the justice it deserves, Maggie Quinn: She was mature, eloquent, charming in a sarcastic kind of way, and had that super-teenager vibe — like the female leads in teen movies like Easy A and Mean Girls.

I not only loved her, I wanted to be her. The characters were absolutely fantastic and written to a standard beyond stereotypical teenage babble. Rosemary-Clement takes a different approach — the main characters are intelligent and move the plot along through a series of witty exchanges and clever discoveries.


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The way Clement-Moore tied in science to a paranormal plot was impressive and is so rarely done within this genre. I felt like I learned a few things by reading these books. Random Jeopardy trivia stuff, but still, I rarely get that even in adult books. These damn things could keep on going forever. Apr 28, Steph Su rated it really liked it Shelves: High school senior and aspiring journalist Maggie Quinn just wants to survive the last few weeks of high school without getting sucked into the prom madness.

These boys and girls suffer accidents or lose what is most important to them, and Maggie, with the help of her friends, reluctantly admits that something sinis High school senior and aspiring journalist Maggie Quinn just wants to survive the last few weeks of high school without getting sucked into the prom madness. These boys and girls suffer accidents or lose what is most important to them, and Maggie, with the help of her friends, reluctantly admits that something sinister and distinctly hellish might just be happening, and it might take a trip to the prom for her to come get to the bottom of it.

Oh, Rosemary, how do I love thy writing? Let me count the ways. Maggie is my kind of protagonist: Girl vs Evil series. I had to order the first two books in the Maggie Quinn series, which was a bummer since the author is uber cool and local. So, please request this book at your local store. Come on, look at the cover! The Setting — is a small college town.

Maggie is in high school so a lot of the story takes place between her school and home. I think that a lot of the feel for the book comes through how Rosemary says things. Yo I had to order the first two books in the Maggie Quinn series, which was a bummer since the author is uber cool and local. You get a feel for the setting in the small details of how she writes. Maggie has a quick wit that makes you laugh and she really comes off the page. There are two different guys in her life, both of which have their qualities you cheer for, but in the end only one guy can get the girl.

Is it Bryan, the Baywatch Hottie? Or Justin, the college Catholic School Boy? The Plot — is very Nancy Drew. However, the difference is in the paranormal aspect; Maggie is clairvoyant which leads her to try to stop a string of really weird things happening at her high school. The showdown even takes her to the dreaded P-R-O-M. May 11, Jennifer Wardrip rated it really liked it Shelves: But as the end of her high school years gets closer, Maggie gets warped into the wrath that is Prom. This only happens because Maggie had to protect the school outcast, Stanley, who was being picked on by the prime jocks and their girlfriends, the Jessicas.

Maggie stops this by taking photos of the action, since she is the yearbook photographer, and t Reviewed by Randstostipher "tallnlankyrn" Nguyen for TeensReadToo. Maggie stops this by taking photos of the action, since she is the yearbook photographer, and threatens to use the hideous pictures against them. Maggie believes that she has done the right thing--that is, until Stanley starts yelling at her for helping him out and threatens to make them all pay. Maggie ignores the threat, that is until she begins to have nightmares, which may seem ordinary, but for Maggie they only predict the future.

Soon enough strange things begin to happen at school, all toward the six-pack of Jessicas and an unexpected student. The school's hottie even begins to notice Maggie. Now Maggie has to put on her girl-sleuth outfit and figure out just what exactly is happening, along with Justin, the student that goes to the college that her father works at if only he wasn't so cute. Let's just hope that Maggie can actually figure this out before things become permanent forever. Rosemary Clement-Moore takes on the Prom like never before.

Even though everything may seem weird throughout the story, the ending actually makes it all seem so ordinary. And the relationship that blossoms between Maggie and a certain someone gives the book a little something extra. Readers will not be disappointed with this great read, and some might even think about the consequences when someone bullies another.

Jan 25, K. Lincoln rated it really liked it. Having only read "Spirit and Dust" aimed towards slightly older YA I looked up Clement-Moore's other books and decided to give this slightly "younger" story of a high school journalist's prom from hell literally a go. Such delicious, acerbic wise-crackery, it's almost too much.

Maggie Quinn happens to photograph the Jocks and Jessicas terrorizing a nerd one day on the high school 2nd floor breezeway. All of a sudden, strange things begin to happen to the people around Maggie, and she can no lo Having only read "Spirit and Dust" aimed towards slightly older YA I looked up Clement-Moore's other books and decided to give this slightly "younger" story of a high school journalist's prom from hell literally a go. All of a sudden, strange things begin to happen to the people around Maggie, and she can no longer deny that her "special" dreams she's tried to ignore all her life, can give her insight into what's really going down.

There's a bit of kissing, but otherwise I'll totally recommend this one to my 4th and 6th grade daughters just because Maggie's voice is so snarky. And the way she talks about all the social factions at school makes the bullying, pressures, and social jostling less scary. What I liked best, though is that sprinkled amidst the rampant snarkery are the small details about school-life that Maggie is constantly commenting on. Like the color of the "class song" ballot.

Astrobright Orange is painful at any time of day, but at seven-thirty am it was vomit inducing.

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Also, the only perky I want in front ofm e at that hour is a coffeemaker. Since the drive-thru at Take-Your-Bucks had stretched to Canada, I was still severely caffeine deprived. Apr 22, Kavanand Reading for Two rated it liked it. Maggie Quinn is an aspiring photojournalist, who stumbles upon an evil demon plot in her high school. She attempts to solve the mystery with the help of her awesome grandmother, a jock who's stepping outside his clique, and a very cute college student. The plot isn't terribly original, but beyond that, there's a lot to like about this book. For starters, it's really funny, something that's lacking in most YA paranormal novels the sturm und drang of tortured romance doesn't really lend itself to Maggie Quinn is an aspiring photojournalist, who stumbles upon an evil demon plot in her high school.

For starters, it's really funny, something that's lacking in most YA paranormal novels the sturm und drang of tortured romance doesn't really lend itself to big laughs, I guess.

Prom Dates from Hell (Maggie Quinn: Girl vs Evil)

Maggie isn't a passive heroine by any means. She's smart, funny, and strong, and she wants to solve this mystery and save her classmates. What she really doesn't want is to have to go to prom, but she may have to make that ultimate sacrifice to save her fellow students.

There's a potential romance, and it's a refreshing change from all the tortured YA romances out there right now. Maggie's love interest is perfectly human, and the romance feels rather normal in a good way. Another departure from typical YA tropes is that Maggie has parents who are involved and interested in her life. I understand that absentee parents are a convenient plot device to avoid any adult interference in a swoon-worthy romance, but it gets old sometimes.

Maggie's grandmother is also a very cool character, and she's a big help with the investigation.

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The plot and the heroine are definitely reminiscent of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, but I can't fault anyone for wanting to pay homage to Joss Whedon. And even with these similarities, Prom Dates from Hell is a fast, funny, and extremely enjoyable read. Feb 20, Elizabeth rated it really liked it Shelves: While it is fairly light-hearted in tone, there are serious subjects touched upom such as bullying and date rape.

These are mostly dealt with in a oblique manner, and this book would probably be a safe read for anyone thirteen or older. The plot is more focused on Maggie and her figuring out what in the world is going than anything else. Humor and a quick pace move the reader through the story to a satisfying conclusion. Maggie herself is a charming character who is quite normal. There is even a hint of a romantic triangle between Maggie and two of her allies.

While some of the pop culture references may not age well, most of them are iconic enough that this book should still be fresh in five or ten years. While not deathless prose, it is lively and engaging as well as well written. Clement-Moore has done a superb job of blending everyday high school life with the supernatural in a fresh and interesting way.


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All in all, I would both recommend this book and give it four out of five stars. In the days leading up to senior prom — which Maggie plans to avoid like the plague — Maggie meets a demon conjured up by a fellow classmate. Maggie has spent her life denying that her dreams make her part of the Irish folklore in which her gran believes.

Since no one else sees the demon, it is up to her to hold back the creature's venom. The first victim is a fri With a title like Prom Dates From Hell, it was hard to know what to expect as I opened the covers to meet cheeky heroine Maggie Quinn. The first victim is a friend who is hospitalized after a dive into to the deep end of the school pool during P. Since Karen took Maggie's place in line, did she sustain the injury intended for her as well? With the help of a young college student who is doing research on folklore, Maggie must figure out who the demon will hurt next, who summoned him, and why.

As the prom gets closer the jocks and cheerleaders are picked off one by one. The demon feeds on emotion, not to mention grief, terror, angst and woe - so he's sure to be at the prom. Maggie's attendance becomes mandatory. Which could be worse — facing the demon or going to the prom? Full of quips even when things can't get more serious, Maggie faces evil with humor and style. Maggie likes to say she is Nancy Drewing when she's sleuthing, but she's more like another more recent teenage heroine, Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Buffy could have used Maggie in her hometown of Sunnyvale, the mouth of hell.

For a fun read, make way for Maggie Quinn, the demon slayer. Nov 26, Karin rated it it was amazing Shelves: She is completely content with staying under the radar in order to avoid coming into contact with the Jocks and the Jessicas the girls that seem to run the school.

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Everything is working out just fine until she snaps some incriminating pictures of the Jocks bullying one of the bigger geeks of the school. Soon, after her creative photo rescue, Maggie starts having disturbing dreams. She has ignored her dreams for a long time and has tried to forget the fact that she has psychic abilities. But with someone or something picking off the Jocks and the Jessicas one-by-one, she is going to have to start tapping into her mojo. With the help of her Grandmother and a new friend named Justin, Maggie starts to put her powers to work to solve the mystery.

Maggie Quinn is a delightful main character. She is quick witted, sarcastic, and cynical and her one-liners will have you rolling. Also, there is a Buffy the Vampire Slayer connection - The Prom where Buffy saves the prom from the devil dogs has a similar feel. I enjoyed the heck out of this book. Maggie is NOT going to the prom. She's one of those anti-prom, anti-clique, anti-school-status-quo people. She works for the school newspaper which is apparently published a lot more often than any high school paper I was associated with and emphatically does NOT have prophetic dreams.

She's always had these weird intuitions, which her dad and her dad's mom believe in and understand, and her mom totally doesn't. When a young man chooses a forbidden calling, he must prove his worth. Arcane The Arinthian Line Book 1. When a tyrant plunges the kingdom into chaos, three fourteen-year-old warlocks must learn to work together to survive. An all-age epic fantasy saga. Fatemarked The Fatemarked Epic Book 1. The best new fantasy series I've read in a decade- Book-Absorbed Reviews.

Category: Prom Dates from Hell

Outbreak The Brother's Creed Book 1. The post-apocalyptic action adventure series readers are calling: Breakwater Broken Tides Book 1. From the Hardcover edition. Related Video Shorts 0 Upload your video. Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review. Read reviews that mention school funny college supernatural smart paranormal student heroine teens buffy witty jocks sarcastic demon clement-moore senior nancy stop snarky lisa.

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. Rosemary Clement-Moore is awesome. Now onto the only slightly more articulate review: There aren't more of them. I can't believe it took me so long to find this series, especially since I read and loved Texas Gothic last summer, especially since Prom Dates From Hell was actually Clement-Moore's debut novel released back in But I'm glad I did.

In extremely oversimplified words that in no way gives this series the justice it deserves, Maggie Quinn: It's fast-paced, quirky, and full of characters that are smart beyond the ages on their driver's licenses. Really, these are best described as paranormal Nancy Drew books and, as often as Maggie references Nancy during the book, I think she'd agree. I won't give away anything in the series, but I will say that each of the books follows its own plot there isn't that much of an underlying, "long-term" plot, but the main characters stay mostly the same. And I think if you like one, you'll probably like them all.

I could not put these freaking books down which came in handy since I've been sick and up coughing half the night - might as well read while I'm hacking up a lung. There's so much I that it's really hard to list it all, but here's just a few: She was mature, eloquent, charming in a sarcastic kind of way, and had that super-teenager vibe - like the female leads in teen movies like Easy A and Mean Girls. I not only loved her, I wanted to be her. The characters were absolutely fantastic and written to a standard beyond stereotypical teenage babble. Rosemary-Clement takes a different approach - the main characters are intelligent and move the plot along through a series of witty exchanges and clever discoveries.

The way Clement-Moore tied in science to a paranormal plot was impressive and is so rarely done within this genre. I felt like I learned a few things by reading these books. Random Jeopardy trivia stuff, but still, I rarely get that even in adult books. As for negatives, I really can't think of any which prettymuch puts my reviewer cred on the line. Occasionally I went cross eyed during some of the more in-depth scientific explanations more so in the second book because it dealt with math and math and I aren't even frenemies.

Oh, and the fact that there aren't any more of them. These damn things could keep on going forever. But, given the last one was released in , I'm guessing it's over. Maggie Quinn is an aspiring photojournalist, who stumbles upon an evil demon plot in her high school. She attempts to solve the mystery with the help of her awesome grandmother, a jock who's stepping outside his clique, and a very cute college student.

The plot isn't terribly original, but beyond that, there's a lot to like about this book.


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  6. Paperback Editions.
  7. For starters, it's really funny, something that's lacking in most YA paranormal novels the sturm und drang of tortured romance doesn't really lend itself to big laughs, I guess. Maggie isn't a passive heroine by any means. She's smart, funny, and strong, and she wants to solve this mystery and save her classmates.

    What she really doesn't want is to have to go to prom, but she may have to make that ultimate sacrifice to save her fellow students. There's a potential romance, and it's a refreshing change from all the tortured YA romances out there right now. Maggie's love interest is perfectly human, and the romance feels rather normal in a good way. Another departure from typical YA tropes is that Maggie has parents who are involved and interested in her life. I understand that absentee parents are a convenient plot device to avoid any adult interference in a swoon-worthy romance, but it gets old sometimes.

    Maggie's grandmother is also a very cool character, and she's a big help with the investigation. The plot and the heroine are definitely reminiscent of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, but I can't fault anyone for wanting to pay homage to Joss Whedon. And even with these similarities, Prom Dates from Hell is a fast, funny, and extremely enjoyable read. I discovered this book a while ago perusing Google books and read the preview for it.

    When I got my Kindle a few months ago, I remembered this book and bought it. It is sarcastic my particular brand of humor , smart, funny, and has a good plot line. While many books these days tend to have jumped on the vampire bandwagon, this book deals with the concept of "old" magic in a modern world, making it seem realistic.

    I am not in my teens anymore, but I still thoroughly enjoyed this book! I'm not a book reviewer, but I know what I love--and this book fits that bill.

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    The characters are so well-crafted that they jump off the page, the storyline is fresh and exciting. I read slowly to make sure I didn't miss any of the author's wry humor--and to make the book last and last. This is a wonderful read that will delight adults and teens alike. Maggie Quinn is a smart, sassy heroine that should be the norm in YA literature. It's nice to see a girl kick this much ass!