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I recommend this book to those with a historical interest, and those who want to really good and interesting and unusual story, that is absolutely believable! I think think Louise Erdrich is one of Americas best writers right now. The premise of this story is startling -- a woman who takes on the role of a priest serving the Indian village of Little No Horse.

Her life is followed as both priest and woman. The characters are exquisitely developed, with all their flaws and gifts. The writing is powerful and original. In the end, the story is about love, in all its forms. This is the third Eldrich novel I've read, and none has disappointed me. She is a deeply gifted writer. I had not realized that I had missed reading this book What an interesting, touching story, so poetically told, and of course, you will recognize some of the characters she has followed along the way.

This book was brought to our club by a member who loves Native American themed books, a genre that I will read but not seek out on my own. So, I wasn't anticipating loving it as much as I did. Without providing a synopsis of this book that you can get from editorial and reader reviews already here, I just want to say that this is one of those really satisfying literary works for people who crave beautiful language, rich imagery and a strong, emotional connection to the characters.

Erdrich is off the charts on all three. Never contrived, and often humorous, this book is now on my A-list for recommendations. I just loved it. Perhaps the best book I have read this year.

The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse by Louise Erdrich

Louise Erdrich creates an incredible plot that addresses gender, church politics, spirituality, forgiveness, and the cohesion of Christianity and the way of the Ojibwe Indians. The Native American storytelling and post-modern style of writing was truly enjoyable to read. One person found this helpful.

Despite all the truly horrific things that humans endure, often at the hand of other humans, there is sometimes love. See all reviews. Most recent customer reviews. A difficult read -- requires a lot Published 2 months ago. Published 4 months ago. Published 6 months ago. Published 7 months ago. Published 8 months ago.

What a powerful story of struggling with faith Published 10 months ago. Published 1 year ago. Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway. Set up a giveaway. Customers who viewed this item also viewed. Future Home of the Living God: Pages with related products. See and discover other items: There's a problem loading this menu right now. Get fast, free shipping with Amazon Prime.


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Your recently viewed items and featured recommendations. View or edit your browsing history. Get to Know Us. English Choose a language for shopping. He is faced with the most difficult decision: Should he tell all and risk everything. In a masterwork that both deepens and enlarges the world of her previous novels set on the same reservation, Louise Erdrich captures the essence of a time and the spirit of a woman who felt compelled by her beliefs to serve her people as a priest.

The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse is a work of an avid heart, a writer's writer, and a storytelling genius. Thanks for signing up! We've emailed you instructions for claiming your free e-book. Tell us more about what you like to read so we can send you the best offers and opportunities. By submitting your email address, you understand that you will receive email communications from Bookperk and other HarperCollins services. You may unsubscribe from these email communications at any time. Specialty Booksellers Interest-specific online venues will often provide a book buying opportunity.

International Customers If you are located outside the U. Harper Perennial On Sale: Paul Magazine "A magnificent storyteller … delivering musical prose charged by powerful metaphors. Paul Star-Tribune "Bold and imaginative. Original Fire by Louise Erdrich. The unifying aspect of sex becomes the force early in this story that turns the plot back to Tracks , bringing an astonishing depth to a story we thought we already knew. It is the spiritual transcendence mistaken as a loss of faith that makes this novel so rich. If survival is to be more than a physical act, survivors need to evolve spiritually, which here seems to be not a loss of faith but a loss of misunderstanding.

If you yoked Faulkner with Garcia-Marquez, and anointed them with the comic hijinx of John Irving, you would experience a sense of Louise Erdrich's poetic, visually imaginative power. She interweaves a traditional pagan mysticism with Catholic catechism, the animate with the anthropomorphic. The central figure, Father Damien Modeste, is a Catholic missionary priest who, since coming to the Little No Horse reservation in , has fluidly blended the customs of the Ojibwe people with the Holy Tri If you yoked Faulkner with Garcia-Marquez, and anointed them with the comic hijinx of John Irving, you would experience a sense of Louise Erdrich's poetic, visually imaginative power.

The central figure, Father Damien Modeste, is a Catholic missionary priest who, since coming to the Little No Horse reservation in , has fluidly blended the customs of the Ojibwe people with the Holy Trinity. Through his eighty years there on the reservation he is at least years old now , he has integrated the spiritual faiths into a potent hybrid, a mystic fusion that also informs the book's imagery, without a shred of proselytizing. Father Damien takes great pleasure in forgiveness, in absolving all of people's sins at confession.

Many of Erdrich's characters develop over time in her Argus novels, with intricate histories and relationships. Erdrich's use of the multi-narrative voice and nonlinear storyline brings specific characters in and out of focus at different times and in different books. It is difficult to review this novel without mentioning some surprises about Father Damien's identity, which is shared in the first several pages.

However, I leave that to the reader to discover, and will give very little plot point information. Father Damien is now at the end of his life. He has been writing letters to the Vatican asking for spiritual guidance for half a century, awaiting a reply, persevering in this quest. When Father Jude shows up, it is not for the reasons Damien is hoping for. The Sister is inexplicably bound up with some reported miracles on the reservation. However, she was also a treacherous woman responsible for the tragic fate of several people.

During the investigation of Sister Leopolda, Father Damien's extraordinary life unfolds. Erdrich's prose is so dense and dynamic that you can extract any line and see multiple images expanding. Her sentences are not merely strung together to get to the next one. Like beautiful poetry, the journey of a single phrase can make you pause and shudder. Her sense of character is not limited to the sentient and her depiction of place contains a blend of what is now and what is ancient. I am still revisiting passages just for its supple beauty.

Flinty, brutal, feral, mystical, and inflammatory, this book is a postmodern world of the supernatural and earthly, intoxicated with great passion and love, deep sorrow and regret. And occasionally, it is hilarious. I observed immediately that Erdrich's narrative keeps the reader at a certain distance, but it's the same way that the moon is at a distance when we gaze upon it. Too close and we would lose perspective. Within the chapters are subheadings that could rightly be their own vignettes and character studies.

The structure reflects Erdrich's fealty to oral storytelling --the Native American tradition of language and the land, of birth and death, of revenant spirits, and the eternal cycles of nature. Father Damien's letters to the Vatican and his interview with Father Jude weaves the disparate narratives together, and shows the reader his candor beyond the cloak of secrecy.

I can see a higher power inhabiting the nun's fingers that channel Chopin; in the heart that beats in its cage; brittle old bones buried in the earth; the broken bits of sun flashing through the trembling leaves; a cold fat moon of an early frost; the long shadow of a life. View all 3 comments. I have to admit that I didn't finish this book. I vowed to myself, back when I slogged my way through the insufferable Anna Karenina , that I would never again finish a book just because I had started it -- and I continue to live by that standard.

Still, I came very near the end, and my complaint about The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse could not have been repaired in the space left. What it boils down to is this: The reason is simple. They all had the same connection to their sensations and feelings as Agnes, and that is just not feasible.

All of her characters engage completely with the world around them. They all feel the textures and smell the smells and taste the tastes and hear the sounds and see beyond boring sight. One character with that gift in a story is totally believable. Two characters in a story I can understand. But more than that and I call "bullshit. It's a shame too. Erdrich is a truly poetical prose artist. I just don't believe in her characters, and that is all important to me. View all 13 comments. I just loved this book. Such a wonderful portrayal of Father Damien actually a woman who finds her life as a priest through very strange circumstances and the Ojibwa Indians on a Dakota reservation.

The prose was beautiful and while the story went back and forth from past to present, Erdrich does such a fantastic job acquainting the reader with all the main characters and their stories this was not confusing to me.

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I felt like I was intimately acquainted with all of them, and loved reading abo I just loved this book. I felt like I was intimately acquainted with all of them, and loved reading about their lives. Some parts made me laugh and some parts made me sad, I had such compassion for most of these characters. Didn't want the book to end.

View all 4 comments. Sep 27, Neal Adolph rated it it was amazing Shelves: I need a chance to catch my breath; maybe I need to learn how to breathe once again; maybe I need to get new lungs. This novel is massive in I need a chance to catch my breath; maybe I need to learn how to breathe once again; maybe I need to get new lungs.

This novel is massive in scale, in storytelling, in its shaping of characters. It is also a massive success, a true accomplishment, a testament to the power of literature. I have struggled to write about it now for days; not for lack of trying. I have written several reviews, written about it in my reading diary, in my writing diary, and several times in my journals as I reflect upon its lessons in unexpected moments.

I will fail to keep this draft as short as I hoped to. This book is an Epic about Love, with the Germanic Capitalization fully intact and intended. Love is the central character of this story; a love of place, of God, of a community, of trees, of rivers, of cars, of wives, of broken wives, of work, of devotion, of books, of music, of the feeling of a piano under your feet, of virginal statues, of making virginal statues, of women, of men, of the careful line between the two, of influence and dependence, of marriage, of divorce, of moose, of lives well lived, of lives cut short, of the Western world, of the First Nations.

This book is an Epic about Love. It plays with it, of course, rolls the idea of Love around in its mouth like a caramel, sucking out all of the sweetness, turning it into a fully spent melancholy. In the rotations, it plays with the idea of colonialism as it formed itself in the 20th century, with the idea of the church and the devotion of priests to their flock, with the idea of man and the idea of woman, with the great acting of gender, with how gender is understood in different worlds separated by different languages, with the idea of strength, with the idea of weakness, with the idea of spirits, with the idea of witnessing.

Love resurrects a man in this story. It does it twice. Love saves a child from death. Love makes men break their vows. Love brings a cancer patient to the site of their only Love, and Love makes a man care for that man out of Love. Love develops out of an abduction, only to be soured, in a matter of sentences, by the mystery of heartbreak and the birth of a child. Love separates a mother from her daughter after the daughter has been separated from her mother. This book is an Epic about Love, and Love is a beautiful, rupturing catastrophe in the form human.

There were times when reading this book required putting it down and not reading it. There are stories here which seem to play with your heart without regard. Tragedy after tragedy piles up, and the characters which are briefly explored become important and beautiful, well-loved figures in your literary imagination just before their world in crumpled beneath them or around them. But these events are punctured by joyful, beautiful moments, even by humour.

You will laugh at the folly of man while reading this book, and you will spend days walking in a malaise, wondering if you will ever acquire the strength to read and be vulnerable with literature again. We are offered all of these sensations in the most wonderful writing, poetic and earthy and compassionate. It could be no other way. Have I mentioned yet this is an Epic of Love? There are new images, new events in this small head of mine, they are linked to this book, and they will hopefully never leave me.

One of them is that incredible, respectful ending. At least, not quite as a standalone fixture. I would have appreciated a bit more of a grounding in the history of the space and place, and maybe a bit more help making sense of the powerful women that move in and out of the story. This book is better because I have read and loved Tracks. Tracks is better because I have read and loved this book. We should breathe with each of these Little No Horse books into us as it takes each of its individual stories and weaves them with the stories we find in the other books set in this same reservation; this is a history of multiplicities, of many events, and we are invited to watch as Erdrich develops this community into something vast and amazing through several books, each with its own perspective, each with its own flavour of generosity, each with its own intent, each with its own explanation of the very human, tragic, and beautiful past of this imagined community.

This parasitic, maybe symbiotic relationship is a marvel and honour to witness. This is the full revelation of literary power. Erdrich is the real deal. View all 11 comments. Feb 20, Allie Riley rated it it was amazing. It consists of the recollections of "Father Damien Modeste" in reality Agnes DeWitt, an ex-nun who narrowly escaped being murdered at the beginning of the story of 'his' ministry to the Native Americans on the Ojibwe reservations.

Throughout his time there he had written copious letters to the Vatican conc "What is the whole of our existence but the sound of an appalling love? Throughout his time there he had written copious letters to the Vatican concerning the possible canonisation of Sister Leopolda ne Pauline Puyat and the narrative flashes between the stories they related and his final revelations to the representative who arrives, at last, in response to the them.

In the process, a great many grand themes are dealt with: All of which is to reduce this wonderfully evocative novel to a prosaic list. I cannot do it justice. Allow Erdrich's faboulous saga to envelop you. Drink deeply of its wisdom. Apr 04, David rated it it was amazing. It has been a while since I read a book which made me genuinely laugh out loud as I read it and which brought me to tears at other times. This book was one of those types of reads for me. I have read a few of Erdrich's previous novels and I have enjoyed all of them. In every one of her novels we are exposed to the inner thoughts and dialouge's of her multiple characters.

Many of her works deal with the different extremes of love and how one experiences love in its different forms. From the mount It has been a while since I read a book which made me genuinely laugh out loud as I read it and which brought me to tears at other times. From the mountainous Mary Kashpaw and her silent and enormous love for Father Damien; through Lulu and her many and frequent liasons; all the way to Agnes herself and her abiding, all-encompasing, life-time's worth of love for her adopted people; we get to witness different forms of love as we read this novel. Love can redeem us and love can curse us but it is what makes us most human.

This was a truely humanizing work which I would recommend to anyone who enjoys a nice slow progression of a plot with many fine details and many individual moments of laughter, sadness, ferocity, and spirit. To end with a quote from Father Damien, "What is the whole of our existence but the sound of an appalling love? What a beautiful ending for another complex story by Louise Erdrich! This is a book that twisted my opinions around its premises more times than once. At times preposterous, and at times profound--this tale binds the reader up into its characters' choices.

Choices that we don't always agree with, but seem frequently to find ourselves complicit in. And although sometimes I felt that small plot twists were a bit pat, I found that their weave into the greater tapestry of Erdrich's telling were more What a beautiful ending for another complex story by Louise Erdrich! And although sometimes I felt that small plot twists were a bit pat, I found that their weave into the greater tapestry of Erdrich's telling were more forgivable once we understand where she has brought us.

This book is a masterpiece. View all 6 comments. This epic spans generations but centers around the life of the fascinating Father Damien. Every aspect of his story is compelling, as are the journeys into the lives of other characters on the reservation. Erdrich deftly balances depth and breadth to create a vast yet intricately detailed and rich web of personalities, relationships, and histories. The tension between Catholicism and traditional Ojibwe spirituality is explored poignantly without demonizing either side.

Erdrich writes with a powe This epic spans generations but centers around the life of the fascinating Father Damien.

The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse

Erdrich writes with a powerful, vivid clarity and characterizes her subjects with such depth and truth that I cannot wait to read the rest of her novels. I enjoyed Love Medicine a few months ago and was thrilled to see many of the same characters in this novel. In the end notes, she thanks Paybomibiness Dennis Jones , who taught at the University of Minnesota while I was a student there and spoke to my American Indian philosophies class about Ojibwe spirituality. He was fascinating and funny. Another beautiful, moving book from Ms. Probably her most ambitious. There's some great, hilarious stuff with Nanapush in this book, scenes that I'm sure I'll always remember -- a moose chase gone awry, and a series of very funny resurrections.

There are also many beautiful passages about faith, some of which caused me to close the book and think for a while before moving on. For me, that's a sign that a book is working on me at a deeper level than just story. I'd call this a must-read, t Another beautiful, moving book from Ms.

I'd call this a must-read, though if you're a first-timer to her work, you might be better off starting with an earlier novel so you have some background on the characters. Having re-read "Love Medicine" late last year, I was in a better position to grasp her incredibly complex Ojibwe family tree. Oct 19, Francine rated it it was amazing. This was my introduction to Louise Erlich, and I have since read most of her books. Her writing is exquisite. She brings forth the experience of the Native American with great accessiblity and little romance in the sense of wanting people to be in a way that they actually are not.

This story is based on a person that actually existed and fooled everyone in contact with her into believing she was not only a man, but a priest. This is a singularly remarkable book and written with such compassion This was my introduction to Louise Erlich, and I have since read most of her books. This is a singularly remarkable book and written with such compassion and at the same time detachment I saw her speak once and told her that I tended to take her descriptions of ethnic traditions and stories as fact, could she comment?

She said she often takes a true story, and then embellishes how she thinks things must have been, using her knowledge of her Native American relatives and her own view of how it is to be a human being. She gave a specific example but I'll keep that to myself. That was good enough for me. My experience with this book was one of the most unique I ever had when reading, particularly with one chapter toward the end in which i found myself both laughing and crying, almost simultaneously.

I have taught Erdrich's short stories to college survey courses and she was a favorite of my students. The narrative saga of her Objiwe characters continues, specifically in Kapshaw, Nanapush, and Fleur, but you don't need to have had read her previous works to enjoy this one. The story is definitely My experience with this book was one of the most unique I ever had when reading, particularly with one chapter toward the end in which i found myself both laughing and crying, almost simultaneously.

The story is definitely mesmerizing: She adopts the language and culture of her new congregation as well as adds to the Holy Trinity a fourth component: The story also reminds me of a true life story of a saint, but from Roman times: This book is easily one of the best books I have read in the last five years. Erdrich's prose reads like poetry and her use of language is so elegantly accomplished I often found myself either moved to tears or simply breathless from the impact of her words.

Erdrich skillfully prepared each and every word, phrase and sentence before it was placed on the page much like a chef prepares a fine meal- to delight the reader's palate and imagination. I dreaded the end of this book only beca Incredible! I dreaded the end of this book only because I did not want the story to end. This delivers from start to finish and I put it down upon completion fully satisfied and delighted by the experience.

Something I've noticed going through the reviews of Erdrich's books on here is that she gets compared a lot to William Faulkner. This makes some sense. Like Faulkner's Yoknapatawpha, Erdrich has created her own community filled with well fleshed out characters at Little No Horse. There's a vast and impressive history she's made up filled with multiple viewpoints all along the way.

But the author who Erdrich reminds me the most of was Woolf. She's got the same ability to occupy her characters' ps Something I've noticed going through the reviews of Erdrich's books on here is that she gets compared a lot to William Faulkner. She's got the same ability to occupy her characters' psyche, the same sense of artistic imagery and the plot of The Last Report on the Miracles Little No Horse probably sounds pretty familiar to Woolf fans.

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It focuses on a gender changing person chosen by fate to live an unnaturally long life, viewing many major historical events from the sidelines all the while. Does that ring a bell yet? But to compare Erdrich feels reductive to her talents.